Bachelor of Business Computing

Application & Registration Closing Date: 9th February 2018

START:
12th February 2018
DURATION:
4 Years on FT and 5.5 Years on PT/DE
ID:
BBC

The Bachelor of Business Computing (BBComp) programme is designed to meet the growing demand for Information and Communications Technology (ICT) knowledge among the business fraternity in both the private and the public sectors as well as groom prospective entrepreneurs in the use of ICTs in business. It is intended for the following groups of people:

  1. School leavers who want to become business persons or entrepreneurs.

  2. Current business people in both the private and public sectors.

The Bachelor of Business Computing degree programme is a University of Zambia (UNZA) programme offered and administered by ZCAS. Students will therefore register at ZCAS and the teaching and examination of the programme will also take place at ZCAS. In administering the programme, ZCAS will observe the University of Zambia quality assurance standards including the appointment of qualified lecturers to teach the courses. The University of Zambia will confer the degree of Bachelor of Business Computing on the graduates of the programme.

1.1 AIM

To equip candidates with knowledge and skills of business management and the use of ICTs in the business environment, in order to enable them to conduct business more effectively.

1.2 OBJECTIVES

At the end of the programme, candidates should be able to:

  • demonstrate a thorough grounding in the fundamental theories, concepts, principles and practices of ICT as it relates business.

  • demonstrate critical business abilities of analysis, interpretation, evaluation and judgement using ICT.

  • complete and present a research project of 10,000 words to the specified standard.

1.3 RATIONALE

With the increased use of computer technology in all spheres of life, it has become imperative for the business community to recognise the use of ICTs in business as a competitive tool. No business can survive nowadays without the use of ICTs. Mobile computing has particularly become available to everyone, with the internet becoming a dominant feature in electronic business. In order to be competitive in such an environment, entrepreneurs and other business persons need to harness ICTs in their businesses. The Bachelor of Business Computing degree is meant to equip such persons with the skills to compete in the changing global market where the internet is a key tool. The need for competitiveness in business has made it necessary for the Zambia Centre for Accountancy Studies (ZCAS) in association with the University of Zambia to produce a product that will make it possible for graduates to effectively use ICTs in their businesses and thus enhance the development of Zambia.

2.0 ADMISSION, GRADING AND AWARD CRITERIA

2.1 Admission criteria

To qualify for admission to the BBComp Programme an applicant must have a minimum of five credits at O’ level including English and Mathematics and must satisfy the entrance requirements of the BBComp programme which are:

  1. Holder of a Business Management related Degree

or

  1. Holder of any other relevant advanced diploma in Business Management

  2. Holder of any relevant 3 year diploma in any business related area from a reputable college or university

or

  1. Three ‘A’ level passes including Mathematics or equivalent

  1. Holder of relevant business experience supported by appropriate CV and reference(s) may be admitted on mature-age basis subject to approval by an admissions panel.

2.2 Regulations governing the award of Bachelor of Business Computing degree

2.2.1 Duration of study

The programme of study for the award of the Bachelor of Business Computing degree shall be completed in a period of:

  1. Not less than three and not more than five academic years in the case of

full-time students who have satisfied the requirements of the regulations

  1. Not less than four and not more than six academic years in all other

cases (from the date of first registration)

For the purpose of computing the maximum period for the course of study where a person undertakes the study for the degree partly as a part-time and partly as a full-time student, eight (8) courses successfully completed by the student shall count as one academic year.

2.2.2 Student progression

  1. The Programme of study shall be taken in the sequence approved by the University of Zambia Senate with lower level foundation courses being undertaken and completed before a student proceeds to higher level and specialized courses of study.

  2. A Candidate who passes all the courses taken during the academic year of study shall be allowed to proceed to the next year of study.

  3. Every semester a full-time student shall register for and take not less than four and not more than five courses. Registration for year-long courses must be done every semester.

  4. A part-time student shall register for and take not more than three courses in any semester of the academic year.

  5. Provided that a student may in exceptional circumstances be permitted to take one additional course whether carried over from the previous academic year or additional in any one semester.

  6. A student who fails in one course may be permitted to proceed to higher level courses provided he or she repeats the course at the first available opportunity.

  7. A student who fails two courses in any academic year will normally proceed to Part-time studies until he or she has cleared the outstanding courses.

  8. A student who fails in more than two courses in his or her academic year of study will be excluded.

  9. Every semester an Evening Programme student shall register for and take three courses. Registration for year-long courses must be done every semester.

  10. An Evening Programme student who fails up to two courses in any academic year will receive the comment ‘Proceed and repeat’

  11. An Evening programme student who fails more than two courses in one academic year will be excluded.

  12. A Full-time, Part-time or Evening student who fails a course twice is subject to exclusion but he or she may be permitted to repeat the course for the third and final time.

  13. Exclusion is applicable in compliance with the preceding regulations in any year of study including the final year.

      1. Deferred and supplementary examinations

  1. A student who is unable to sit the scheduled examinations and qualifies on compassionate grounds may be awarded a deferred examination in one or more courses. A deferred examination will be graded normally – between D and A+.

  2. A student who has failed a course in a scheduled examination may be awarded a supplementary examination in the failed course if he or she meets the following criteria:

    1. Full-time student – The student has passed three courses at the grade of at least C+ and achieved a D+ in the examination of the said course.

    2. Part-time/ evening student – The student has passed two courses at the grade of at least C+ and achieved a D+ in the examination of the said course.

  3. A supplementary examination is marked on a pass/fail basis.

For the avoidance of doubt, all matters relating to the administration of both academic and administrative elements of the Bachelor of Business Computing programme shall be administered by ZCAS using its institutional framework subject to the guidance of University of Zambia Senate regulations.

    1. ASSESSMENTS AND GRADING

    2. Assessments

Assessments shall be made of a combination of examinations and coursework. Examinations consist of at least one paper in each of the relevant examinable courses while some courses shall be assessed by way of coursework. Examinations shall normally last for three hours.

To be eligible for the award of the Bachelor of Business Computing degree, a student must have:

  1. Completed a minimum total of 25 Courses.

  2. Passed all core courses;

  3. Adhered to the requisite course combinations in the programme;

  4. Completed a Directed Business Computing Project with a pass.

    1. Grading

For all examinable courses the distribution of marks shall be as follows:

Final Examination 60%

Continuous assessment 40%

Two Assignments 10%

Two Tests 20%

Lab / Practical Sessions (where applicable) 10%

Total 100%

Where no lab / practical sessions are involved, there will be two assignments totalling 20%, as well as two tests, totalling 20%, making the grand total of Assignments and tests 40%.. Where there are variations to this, these are indicated in the specific course outline.

In the grading of final assessment results, the following scale will apply:

Percentage Letter Grade

86 and above A+ Distinction

76-85 A Distinction

66-75 B+ Meritorious

61-65 B Very Satisfactory

56-60 C+ Definite Pass

50-55 C Bare Pass

    1. D+ Bare Fail

0 – 39 D Definite Fail

3.3 Classification of the Degree Qualification

  1. The grading of the Bachelor of Business Computing degree is based on all grades obtained in all courses in Year 3 and Year 4 of the programme.

  2. In calculating the grade of the degree, the following points shall be applied to the grades obtained.

A+ 2.5 points

A 2 points

B+ 1.5 points

B 1 points

C+ 0.5 point

C 0 point

  1. No points are awarded where a course has been repeated. Points will be calculated on the basis of the last sixteen 16) courses completed in Year 3 and Year 4. The Research Project paper carries twice the points as any other course.

  1. The points for classification of the degree shall be as follows:

Distinction 32 and above

Merit 24 – 31

Credit 16 – 23

Pass 8 – 15

4.0 EXEMPTIONS

  1. A student who has, prior to admission to the BBComp, attended, whether at the University of Zambia, ZCAS or elsewhere, courses of instruction and passed examinations equivalent in standard to courses and examinations which form part of the programme of study may, subject to approval, be exempted from attendance of classes and examinations in those courses.

  2. No candidates shall be awarded exemptions in more than 50% of the courses required for the award of the degree.

  3. Exemptions shall only be granted on the basis of relevant, equivalents or higher qualifications, the least being an advanced diploma, acquired prior to commencement of the BBComp.

  4. Qualifications obtained more than seven years prior to commencement of the BBComp

shall not qualify for exemptions.

  1. An Exemption Fee shall be applicable where an exemption has been granted.

5.0 COURSE CODES

The letters of the course codes are an abbreviation of the course name(s) while the first digit stands for the year/level of study. The second digit is the serial number of the course in the year of study and the last digit indicates whether it is a first/second semester year course. For example, BBC 142 means Bachelor of Business Computing, first year course, course number four, offered in the second semester. BBC 211 stands for Bachelor of Business Computing, second year course, course number one offered in the first semester. BBC 342 denotes Bachelor of Business Computing, third year course, course number four, offered in the second semester.

6.0 COURSE STRUCTURE

Each year of study will be divided into two semesters and full-time students are expected to take four courses in each semester while part-time students will take up to three courses. Except for Business Computing Project at fourth year, the courses are structured in such a way that semester one courses are not a pre-requisite for semester two courses in each year. The course structure is as shown in Tables 1 to 4 below.

FIRST YEAR

Semester 1

BBC 111 Academic and Professional Communication

BBC 121 Computing and ICT Skills

BBC 131 Introduction to Computer Systems

BBC 141 Foundations of Business Analytics

Semester 2

BBC 112 Introduction to Economics

BBC 122 ICTs in Society

BBC 132 Computer Programming

BBC 142 Quantitative Methods

SECOND YEAR

Semester 1

BBC 211 Group Projects and Dynamics

BBC 221 Business Information Systems

BBC 231 Financial Accounting

BBC 241 Databases and Information Management Systems

SECOND YEAR (Continuation)

Semester 2

BBC 212 Human Computer Interaction

BBC 222 Computer Networks and Data Communications

BBC 232 Introduction to Financial Management

BBC 242 Project Management

THIRD YEAR

Semester 1

BBC 311 E-Commerce

BBC 321 Principles of Management

BBC 331 Wireless and Mobile Networks

BBC 341 Object Oriented Analysis and Design

Semester 2

BBC 312 Business Systems Analysis

BBC 322 Ethics in Computing

BBC 332 Strategic Risk Management

BBC 342 Multimedia

FORTH YEAR

Semester 1

BBC 411 Advanced Databases

BBC 421 Information and Network Security

BBC 431 Web Engineering

BBC 441 Consultancy Skills

Semester 2

BBC 412 Software Engineering

BBC 422 Business Strategy

BBC 432 Entrepreneurship

BBC 442 Business Computing Project

A review of the course outlines and contents shall be made every five years.

COURSE OUTLINES

Course BBC 111: Academic and Professional Communication

Pre-requisites: None

AIMS

The aims of the course are:

  • To equip students with the knowledge and skills relevant for success in formal academic and professional communication
  • To enable students to apply communication skills in interpersonal and transactional contexts.
  • To equip students with the ability to research and present research results professionally,
  • To enhance skills in the choice of selection of relevant material for evaluation, self- refection, balanced and ethical writing, logical structure, and critical thinking.

RATIONALE

There is no academic programme which does not require the vehicle of proper academic and professional communication skills. Proper academic and professional communication skills are required to help students present their work in the right format to meet international standards. Students also require interpersonal skills as well as good writing skills to succeed in their future careers. They need to know how to manage their emotional intelligence to succeed in presenting their views and research findings in an ethical, balanced, objective, holistic, and acceptable manner to authorities. Students need skills in critiquing a piece of writing objectively by paying attention to issues of content, context, style, methodological approaches, punctuation, diction, grammar, among other variables.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

1. Evaluate a piece of writing on the bases of different styles and formats conducive to business

2. Apply the appropriate and accepted formats for academic referencing

3. Apply skills in generating business documents such as memorandum, questionnaires, and reports

4. Apply skills of critical and logical thinking, balanced and reflective writing, and ethical writing

5. Correctly, verbally and non-verbally communicate in a culturally correct manner.

COURSES CONTENTS

PART A-INTRODUCTION

  • Note-taking from books, lectures, internet- to assist students be able to quickly glean cogent points from a variety and large volume of sources
  • Harvard referencing style and others such as APA, Chicago, MLA, Turabian
  • Advantages of correct academic referencing, plagiarism, ethical issues, copyright and intellectual property- paying attention to author’s surname, initials, title, city of publication, publisher; Journals to have italics for journal names
  • Academic writing, critique and balanced writing-requirements for journal and peer-referenced articles, role in research, standards used for critiquing

PART B-COMMUNICATION

  • The communication process, importance, barriers to communication, effective communication -arrow, circuit and dance or 360 degree (all-channel communication)
  • Communication, formal and informal- how they complement each other
  • Types of communication- verbal, non-verbal communication, electronic, symbols, visual, audio-need to explore all
  • Types of feedback, negative and positive feedback, importance of feedback for motivation, reinforcement, employee engagement, organizational change and improvement
  • Channels and mediums of communication, social media, face-to-face communication, external and internal, LAN, WAN
  • Body language-chronemics, proxemics, para-linguistics, kinesics, haptics, gestures, posture, gesticulations

PART C -STUDY SKILLS

  • Study Skills, study areas, personal timetables, time management, group study, group work and discussions
  • Oral presentations, meetings, seminars, symposia, colloquia, conferences.
  • Data Search and proper communication of search results, Google scholar, emerald
  • Revise, review, recite, recall, apply, integrate

PART D LANGUAGE AND WRITING SKILLS

  • Parts of speech-verbs, adverbs, adjectives, pronouns, nouns,
  • Figures of speech, idioms, paradox, hyperbole, litotes, similes, metaphors, paradoxes
  • Comprehension and summary techniques- use of synonyms and antonyms, paraphrasing
  • Report writing, sections of a report or dissertation- introduction, research proposal, methodology, findings and analysis, conclusions and recommendations
  • Academic essays, descriptive, argumentative, narrative, expository
  • Letter writing and types, CVs, memorandum report, emails

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

60%

Seminars

2 hours/week

Three Tests of equal weight

45%

 
   

One Seminar Presentation

15%

 
         
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

40%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Clampitt, Philip, G. (2012) Communicating for Managerial Effectiveness New York: Sage Publications

  2. Bell, Alicia (2003) Business Grammar, Style & Usage: The Most Used Desk Reference

Thomson West, Aspatore Books

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Cody, S. (2010) The Art of Writing and Speaking English Language, word-study and Composition and Rhetoric. Amazon Publishers.
  1. Dainton, Marianne & Zelley, Elaine D. (2010) Applying Communication Theory for Professional Life New York; Sage Publications
  2. Ehrenhaft, G. (2012) English Language and Composition. Amazon Publishers

  3. Garner, Bryan, A. ( 2013) HBR Guide to Better Business Writing (HBR Business Guide Series) Boston: HBR Press

  4. HBR (2013) HBR’s 10 Most Reads on Communication Boston: HBR Press

  5. Kaul, Asha (2009) Business Communication. New Delhi

  6. Murphy, Raymond (2012) English Grammar in Use (4th ed.) London: Cambridge University Press

  7. Strunk, William & White, E. B.(2009) The Elements of Style New York: WLC Publisher

BBC 121: Introduction Computing and ICT Skills

Pre-requisites: None

AIM

The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to information technologies and related skills in solving real-world problems.

RATIONALE

Computer technologies have been changing rapidly over the years, and much more so in recent time compared to old times. Keeping pace with developments can be a daunting task. This course introduces the student to ways of keeping pace with technology development by examining new technologies and related applications.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify and discuss the physical components of the computer.
  2. Navigate the Microsoft Windows Environment.

  3. Explore the Microsoft Office applications and features.

  4. Discuss an introduction to networking and the internet.

  5. Apply technology skills to solving real-world situations.

COURSE CONTENT

INTRODUCTION TO THE COMPUTER

Computer Hardware;

Computer Software

INTRODUCTION TO MS WINDOWS

Windows Navigation,

Windows File Management,

Formatting and File Management,

Internet Navigation,

MS APPLICATIONS

MS Word;

MS Excel;

MS Power Point;

MS Access,

INTERNET

Internet Search;

Internet Safe Practices;

Macros and VBA

COMPUTER NETWORKS

Definition of Networks

Origin of Networks

Types of Networks

MULTIMEDIA

Graphics and Multimedia

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

60%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Three Tests of equal weight

45%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

One Seminar Presentation

15%

 
         
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

40%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

Beekman, G. and Beekman, B. (2009)Tomorrow’s Technology and You, Complete: International

Edition, 9th Edition. London: Pearson Higher Education

1. Solutions, P. L. (2011). Introduction to Computers and Information Technology . Pearson Prentice Hall.

2. Warford, J. S. (2005). Compter Systems. Sudbury: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Foundation, G. C. (2014, January). All Topics. Retrieved from GCF LearnFree.org: http://www.gcflearnfree.org/topics

  2. Holowczak.com. (2013). MICROSOFT ACCESS 2007, 2010 AND 2013 TUTORIAL. Retrieved from Holowczak.com: http://holowczak.com/microsoft-access-2007-and-2010-tutorial/

  3. Microsoft. (2010). Introduction to computers . Retrieved from Windows 7: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/introduction-to-computers#1TC=windows-7

  4. French, C. S. (1996) Computer Science, ELST

BBC 131: COMPUTER SYSTEMS

PRE-REQUISITES: None

AIMS:

To introduce students to the basics of computing which will form as the foundation to other advanced courses in the Computer Science Program.

Help students prepare for entry-level ICT career opportunities

RATIONALE:

This course provides an introduction to the computer hardware and software skills needed to help meet the growing demand for entry-level information and communication technology (ICT) professionals. The course covers the fundamentals of PC technology and also provides an introduction to advanced concepts of computing. The course explores the various computers available today, their components and peripherals. Students will also learn how to maintain computer equipment, protect hardware from theft or damage, and solve common hardware problems. It also examines how software and hardware work together to perform computing tasks and how software is developed and upgraded. Students will also identify different types of software. Furthermore, students will examine what an operating system is, how it works, and how to manage it. This will include a detailed overview of the Microsoft’s Windows and Linux Operating systems.

OBJECTIVES

On completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. To describe the internal components of a computer, assemble a computer system
  2. Install an operating system, and troubleshoot using system tools and diagnostic software
  3. identify, describe and use communications and networking terminology and technology to include Internet operations and its uses

  4. identify, discuss and use important categories of application software: word processing, spreadsheet, database management, presentation and graphics design, scientific research programmes

  5. demonstrate the basic usage and configuration of Tablets and Mobile Devices (Android, Apple, Windows Mobile)

  6. identify, discuss and use important categories of application software: word processing, spreadsheet, database management, presentation and graphics design, scientific research programmes.

COURSE CONTENT

Information Processing

Data and Information, Role of Information in business, computerized Information System

Basic History of computers, Role and use of computers, advantages of using a computer over manual processing of information

Computer Hardware

Input Devices, Output Devices, Processing Computer Storage Memory

Computer Software

Distinguish between Operating Systems and Systems programs software,

Operating Systems,

Major operating system functions; compare and contrast commonly used operating systems (Windows, Unix/Linux and Apple),

Desktop (Windows, Linux and Apple), Server (Windows and Linux), Mobile Devise/Tablets (Android, Windows and Apple) operating Systems,

Distinguish between: System software and Application software; Command-based system and graphical user interface,

Identify and describe the parts and use of a window in a GUI,

Identify and be able to use common dialog box controls: Radio buttons, Check boxes, Text box, List box, Menus, Command buttons,

Demonstrate desktop management skills: themes, screen savers, backgrounds, Tiling, cascading, Short-cuts and icons, Task bar, Quick Launch, Desktop menus

Demonstrate file management skills: Create and recognize valid file names and folders, Use find, copy, move, rename, delete files and folders

Explain deletion process and recovery methods; Navigation and selection via GUI tools

Computer Application Software Tools

Word Processing

Identify the significant components of the word processing interface,

Perform basic editing, text formatting, move, copy, and cut and paste functions,

Use available view modes, Use essential save and backup options, Use print functions, Create headers and footers,

Use document identification features such as embedded date, time and pagination in headers and/or footers,

Use document style features such as font styles, sizes, colors, margins, alignment, and indentation,

Use document context manipulation functions, such as find, search and replace, spell checker, and a grammarian; use the help system,

Spreadsheets

Perform basic editing, data entry, move, copy, and cut and paste functions.

Perform basic insertion, deletion and modifications to at the sheet/workbook level.

Create, and use formulas, Use basic, built-in spreadsheet functions

Use various addressing and referencing schemes.

Use essential formatting features, including data type, color, alignment, shading, and font characteristics.

Use print functions; Perform basic data representation using graphs and charts; use the Help system.

Databases

Distinguish among file, record, field and character

Describe the purpose and uses of: Tables, Forms, Reports and Queries

Use various GUI based design tools for database creation and manipulation such as wizards or manual database design.

Use relational concepts such as primary and foreign keys, constraints, and referential integrity.

Create and use simple queries for searching and manipulating datasets.

Create simple reports and forms using a GUI interface, including grouping and sorting features.

Presentation Graphics

Describe use of presentations on appropriate data display techniques.

Basic slides creation and design

Using the various editing features such cut, copy, paste

Create and manipulate simple slide shows with outlines and notes.

Create slide presentation that includes text, graphics, animation, and transitions.

Use design layouts and templates for presentations.

Research and Other Application Software

SPSS, AutoCad, Adobe (Flash),Publisher, Microsoft Project, etc (Introduce Any Three)

Tablets and Mobile Devices

Basic configurations of common mobile devices Operating Systems (Android, Apple), Windows Mobile etc.

Basic Navigation and usage of the common mobile devices

Browsing, multimedia, charting, news feed, podcast, blogging, word, spreadsheet, emails, etc

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

50%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

Quizzes

5%

 
   

Laboratory / Practical Work

25%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

50%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED TEXTBOOKS AND MATERIALS:

  1. CISCO IT Essentials Student Resources.
  2. David Patterson and John Hennessy (2011): Computer Organization and Design: The Hardware/Software Interface, (4th Edition), Morgan Kauffman, 2009, Prentice Hall, London, UK. ISBN: 978-0123747501

  3. Stallings W. , (2011) Computer Organization and Architecture (9th ed.) , Prentice-Hall, London, UK. ISBN:978-0132936330
  4. Parsons, June Jamrich (2010), New Perspectives in Microsoft Office Excel 2010 (1st Ed), Cengage Learning, Stamford, USA. ISBN:0538742399
  5. Mark E. Russinovich, David A. Solomon, Alex Ionescu(2012). Windows Internals, Part 1 & 2, 6th Edition, Microsoft Press, Redmond, United States. ISBN: 0-7356-4873-5

RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS:

  1. Randy Bryant and David O’Hallaron (2003):Computer Systems: A Programmer’s Perspective,(2nd edition),  Addison-Wesley, London, UK. ISBN-10: 0136108040
  2. Tanenbaum A.S. , (2006) Structured Computer Organization (5th ed.) , Prentice-Hall, ISBN-10: 0131485210

BBC 141: Foundations of Business Analytics

Pre-requisites: None

AIM

The aims of this course are to:
Advance the student’s knowledge of decision support systems and business intelligence.
Advance the student’s knowledge of how best to model data for use in decision making.
Develop the student’s practical skills in the use of current DSS tools.
Address the difficulties and intricacies of large scale integrated systems.
Develop the student’s ability to choose the most suitable BI tool for different problems.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

1. Develop sound knowledge of the phases of decision making and how decisions are supported.

2. use the Decision Support Systems (DSSs) and Business Intelligence (BI) tools to gather, analyze and present data for use in decision making for Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) and Customer Relations Management (CRM).

3. Effectively use DSS tools to analyze data and present it in a suitable format for making management decisions.

4. Critically analyze the decision making environment and choose the tool and graphical interface best suited for presenting reports.

5. Demonstrate sufficient knowledge of the tools and techniques to construct and store models at varying levels of abstraction for use in DSS.

RATIONALE

Organisations can now easily use intranets and the internet to deliver high value analysis applications to decision makers around the world. Corporations regularly develop distributed systems, intranets, and that enable easy access to data stored in multiple locations, collaboration and communication worldwide. Various information systems applications are integrated with one another and/or with other web-based systems. Some integration even transcends organizational boundaries. Managers can make better decisions because they have more accurate information at their fingertips. Today’s decision support tools utilize the web for their analysis and they use graphical user interfaces that allow decision makers to flexibly, efficiently and easily view and process data and models by using familiar web browsers. This course will equip students with the analytical skills to enable them build decision support systems to support decision making.

COURSE CONTENT

INTRODUCTION

Theories of Business Analytics

Descriptive Analytics

Prescriptive Analytics

DECISION MAKING

Phases of decision making,

Methodologies and techniques for decision making

MODELLING

Simulation;

Optimisation

Sensitivity Analysis

Multi-Dimensional Modeling and presenting management reports

BUSINESS ANALYSIS

Business Analysis

Data Visualization

DATA BASES

Business Intelligence,

Data Warehousing and

Online Analytical Processing,

Data Mining and

Neural.Networks.

DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS

Work Systems and its relationship to Decision Support;

Business Intelligence methodology and its relationships to DSS

Conceptual foundations of DSS methodology

FRAMEWORKS

Frameworks for decision making

Applications of Frameworks in real world

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT

Business Performance Management

Risk Analysis

GROUP SUPPORT SYSTEMS

Collaborative Computer Supported Technologies

Other group support systems

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

 

MARK DISTRIBUTION

   

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

Two Assignments of equal weight

20%

 
   

Laboratory / Practical Work

10%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Efraim Turban, Ramesh Sharda, Dursun Delen, Jay E. Aronson, Ting-Peng Liang and David King,, (2011), Decision Support and Business Intelligence Systems, 9th Edition, 2011, Pearson Education, ISBN -13: 978-0-13-245323-3
  1. Edward Melomed, Irina Gorbach, Alexander Berger and Py Bateman,(2010), Microsoft SQL Server 2010 – Analysis Services, Sams Publishing, ,ISBN 0-672-33001-8

RECOMMENDED READING

Neil FitzGerald, James Edkins, Annete Jonker and Michael Voloshko, (2011), Crystal Reports XI, Official Guide, Business Objects press.

You will also need a book with coverage of Swing (Java’s GUI toolkit) to refer to.

BBC 112: Introduction to Economics

Pre-requisites: None

AIM

The course introduces students to major principles of economics and business. It also exposes students to quantitative economics used in solving problems. It further aims to give the students an understanding of how the economy of a country functions.

RATIONALE

Economics plays a vital role in all sectors of the country, from agriculture, to manufacturing, health, education and many others. A lack of understanding of economics can lead one to making unsound decisions with regard to the business environment which includes the rest of the world. It is necessary for students to appreciate the role of economics in our lives. The Chinese recession is one good example that has led to the whole world experiencing a fall in commodity prices, including the price of oil which has fallen to its all-time low. Understanding how economics affects our lives is essential for business. This course equips the student with the knowledge and skill required for businesses to respond to economic changes in the country and world-wide.

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the course a student should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge in the key concepts in economics for business.

  2. Discuss the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics.

  3. Explain how quantitative techniques can be used to resolve economic problems.

  4. Explain how economics works in society.

COURSE CONTENT

  1. PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS

  1. Functioning of market gains from trade

  2. Demand, supply and price determination

  3. Market failure and regulations

  4. Economics of operating a business

  1. PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS

  1. Introduction

  2. National income

  3. Exchange rates and open economy

  4. Fiscal and monetary policies

  1. QUANTITATIVE ECONOMICS

  1. Mathematical methods in solving economic problems

  2. Basic calculus and techniques for differentiation and optimization

  1. ECONOMICS AND SOCIETY

  1. How does the economy work?

  2. Issues of contemporary economic concerns

  3. Efficiency of markets

  4. Trade

  5. Aid

  6. Globalisation

  7. Self-employment

  8. Unemployment.

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

50%

Tutorials / Case Study

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

40%

 
   

Two Assignments of equal weight

10%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

50%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

McConnell, B., Stanley and Flynn, S. (2008) Economics. McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

RECOMMENDED READING

Hazlitt, H. (1988) Economics in One Lesson: The Shortest and Surest way to Understand Basic Economics. Amazon Publishers.

BBC 122: ICTs in Society

Pre-requisites: None

AIM:

This course explores current influences and effects of ICTs on Society, the challenges and opportunities created by the ICT revolution and its ever changing innovations.

RATIONALE

ICTs have become entrenched in society, ranging from individuals to enterprises. Most courses deal with the hard elements of ICT while the soft elements are rarely discussed. This course takes a soft perspective of ICT and their impact on individuals and the society at large. It considers the challenges inherent with the adaptation of ICTs across the globe and gives the student an overview of ICTs on a global basis.

OBJECTIVES:

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify ICT related social issues in modern-day society and describe the various views that illustrate current disputes and discussions.

  2. Explain the pros and cons of ICT adoption and use by communities

  3. Review and identify elements of ICTs that impact on Society and Culture.

  4. Justify effects of ICTs on individuals, communities and the society.

COURSE CONTENT

1. INTRODUCTION

Society and Information

Culture and Technology

2. TECHNOLOGY ADOPTATIONS AND INTERACTIONS

End-users and Society

Computers, Expectations and Problems

Society and Communications

3. THE DIGITAL SPACE AND SOCIETY

Online Activism

4 GOVERNANCE, POLITICS AND INFORMATION

5. GAMES AND VIRTUAL INFLUENCES

6. WORK and EMPLOYMENT

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

30%

Tutorials

2 hours/week

Two Assignments of equal weight

30%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

70%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

ICT Magazines, Internet, News, Conference proceedings and Online Journals articles.

RECOMMENDED READING 

Jane Laudon, Kenneth Laudon (2012); Essentials of Management Information System,

8th Edition, Pearson

BBC 132 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

PRE-REQUISITES: None

AIM

To introduce the use of an object-oriented programming language and to promote the skills for writing well-structured programs using Java.

RATIONALE

The design and implementation of well-structured programs lies at the heart of computer science. It is a basic skill for which this first course lays the ground work. The programming language JAVA is up-to-date and widely considered as the most promising all round programming language because it contains most of the features needed for present day networked and machine independent software development.

OBJECTIVES

On completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Describe what comprises a legal program in Java

  2. Describe distinguishing features of OO languages

  3. Design Java programs to meet simple requirements, expressed in English

  4. Understand the documentation for and make use of the Java API and other library packages

COURSE CONTENTS

  1. Introduction

What is programming, what is object-oriented programming.

  1. Primitive Java

The Java environment

primitive types, basic operators, Conditional statements – if, while, for, do, break, continue, switch, methods.

  1. References

Basics – the dot operator, Assignments, Parameter passing, Strings – concatenate , Arrays, Exception handling, Input and output.

  1. Objects and classes

Basic methods, Packages, Additional concepts – this, instanceof.

  1. Inheritance

What is inheritance – basic syntax, Visibility, Constructors, Super, method overriding,

abstract methods and classes, multiple inheritance, interface, Implementing generic components, Polymorphism in inheritance

  1. Input/output Operation in Java(java.io Package)

Streams and the new I/O Capabilities, Understanding Streams, The Classes for Input and Output, The Standard Streams, Working with File Object File I/O Basics Reading and Writing to Files, Buffer and Buffer Management, Read/Write Operations with File Channel Serializing Objects.

  1. Thread

Understanding Threads, Needs of Multi-Threaded Programming, Thread Life-Cycle

Thread Priorities, Synchronizing Threads, Inter Communication of Threads, Critical Factor in Thread –Deadlock.

  1. Applet

Applet & Application, Applet Architecture, Parameters to Applet, Embedding Applets in Web page, Applet Security Policies.

  1. Database Programming using JDBC

Introduction to JDBC, JDBC Drivers & Architecture, CURD operation Using JDBC, Connecting to non-conventional Databases.

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation: MARK DISRIBUTION:

Lectures: 3 hours per week Continuous assessment (C.A.) 40% Tutorials: 1 hour per week C.A. Breakdown Practical 20%

Lab: Three hours per week Tests 20%

Final (Theory) Examinations 60%

Total 100%

PRESCRIBED READING

Gaddis T(2012) Starting out with Java: from control structures through objects,5th edition, Addison Wesley ; New Jersey ,USA; ISBN:0-13-285583-9 .

Deitel & Deitel(2011) Java How To Program(early objects) ,9th edition, Prentice Hall; ISBN-10: 0132940949.

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Ying Bai (2011) Practical Database Programming with Java, John Wiley; ISBN: 978-0-470-88940-4.

BBC 142: Quantitative Methods

Pre-requisites: None

AIM

The course aims to introduce the student to quantitative methods with emphasis on statistical analysis.

RATIONALE

Most students in the Zambian context have been found to be weak when it comes to dealing with figures yet most of the human life revolves around having to deal with figures. Quantitative Methods attempt to enhance the skills of students in mathematics related subjects such as accounting, computing and many others. For businesses, it is imperative that people involved are conversant with such methods. Thee course thus teaches the student the ropes of business from a mathematical and analytical perspective.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course students should be able to:

1. Conduct a comparative evaluation of quantitative, qualitative, experimental, and survey

research methods;

2. Design research based upon the research question and constraints;

3. Conduct descriptive and inferential statistical analysis

4. Frame survey research questions;

5. Conduct door-to-door surveys; and

6. Generate research questions, and use statistical tools to answer questions

COURSE CONTENT

INTRODUCTION

  1. Course overview
  2. Social Research

STATISTICS AND STATISTICAL THINKING

  1. Descriptive Statistics
  2. Inferential Statistics
  3. Types of Data

COLLECTING DATA & SURVEY DESIGN

  1. Sampling Methods
  2. Survey Research – I
  3. Survey Research – II

DESCRIBING DATA SETS

  1. Summarizing Qualitative Data
  2. Graphical Techniques for Describing Data
  3. Measures of Central Tendency
  4. Measures of Variability
  5. Combining the Mean and the Standard Deviation

PROBABILITY

    1. Union & Intersection of Events

    2. The Additive Rule of Probability

    3. Conditional Probability

    4. Multiplicative Rule of Probability

RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION

1. The Binomial Distribution

2. The Normal Distribution

3. T-Statistics

THE SAMPLING DISTRIBUTION

      1. The Sampling Distribution off x
      2. Confidence Intervals
      3. Small Sample Confidence Intervals

HYPOTHESIS TESTING

1. The Null and Alternative Hypothesis

2. One or Two Sided Hypothesis

CORRELATION and REGRESSION

  1. Scatterplots
  2. Correlation
  3. Simple Linear Regression

OTHER TESTS

1.Tests between Means of Different Groups;

2.Tests Between Means of Related Groups;

3. ANOVA

4. Factorial ANOVA;

5. Chi-squared tests;

RESEARCH DESIGN

1. Laboratory Time for Term Project

2. Computer Graphics;

3. Laboratory Time for Term Project

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 
   

Two Assignments of equal weight

20%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

Triola F. Mario ( ), Elementary Statistics, 11th edition,

Babbie, E. (2004). Practice of Social Research, 10th ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

RECOMMENDED READING

Bluman G. Allan, ( ), Elementary Statistics 8th edition,

Gould Robert & Ryan N. Colleen ( ); Essential Statistics, by

Salkind, Neil. (2004). Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics, 2nd Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Brase Henry Charles & Brase Pellillo Corrinne, ( ),Understandable Statistics 10th edition,

BBC 211: Group Projects and Dynamics

Pre-requisites: None

AIM

The aim of the course is to equip students with the knowledge and skills needed when working in groups as part of project management. The course includes practical aspects of group and team working, as well as relevant theories and concepts that will allow students to communicate and work well in and with groups.

RATIONALE:

No man is an island”, so goes the saying. In an organization, team work is considered an essential ingredient to success. Most jobs require employees to work as a team in order to accomplish the intended goals and objectives. This course inculcates knowledge and skills in a student which will enable the student to work as a part of a team in a working environment without being a problem. It is essential for the success of organizations and hence the need to be proficient the said knowledge and skills of team building.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. demonstrate professional interpersonal skills, including ethical behaviour in the context of cultural and professional diversity. Students should develop self-reflection and critical thinking habits in order to excel in group working environments.

  2. demonstrate knowledge of theories of human and social behavior related to group dynamics and team working for varied cultural contexts and problem solving situations. They should be able to demonstrate their ability to integrate theoretical knowledge in assessment and evaluation of group work.

  3. Discuss the capacity of group work to inspire a sense of belonging and promote a sense of connection to others, while allowing personal growth. Students will develop skills for managing issues of power, discrimination, and/or stigma in group contexts.

  4. explain the rationale for group work in varied settings and advocate for its use where effective, but discourage broad use where it is not as effective.

  5. demonstrate the ability to engage in research based practice to improve group performance, particularly the ability to utilize feedback from the group process and dynamics.

COURSE CONTENT

  1. Leadership

  2. Conflict Management & Problem Solving

  3. Group Roles

  4. Decision Making & Responsibility

  5. Group Norms

  6. Group Development

  7. Group Participation

  8. Types of Groups

  9. Groupthink

  10. Contemporary Theory: Self Managing Groups

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

60%

Tutorials

2 hours/week

Three Tests of equal weight

30%

 
   

One Group Presentation

30%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

40%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  • Corey MS, Corey G, & Corey, C. (2010). Groups: Process and Practice, 8th Edition. New York : Brooks Cole

RECOMMEDED READING

  • Yalom, Irving (2005). The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy (5th Ed.). New York: BasicBooks.

  • Toseland, R. & Rivas, R.. (2009) Introduction to Group Work Practice (6th ed). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

  • Corey, Corey & Haynes. (2013), Groups in Action : Evolution and Challenges DVD (with Workbook), Second Edition, New York: Brooks/Cole.

BBC 221: Business Information Systems

Pre-requisites: None

AIM

This course aims at developing the personal abilities to work with organisations in the management of business information systems.

RATIONALE:

Modern businesses rely so much on information systems to the extent that without information systems, few if any can survive. It is thus imperative that business people understand the nature of business information systems that they work with. Business Information systems facilitate competitive advantage and must thus be harnessed by all businesses. This course exposes the student to various elements of Business information systems and prepares the student for the application of such systems in the work place. It includes a brief introduction to computer security and considers decision making from ethical, legal, social and professional perspectives.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain and discuss the different types of information required by business functions.

  2. Explain and discuss the requirements of quality business information.

  3. Appraise the range of activities required in business information system.

  4. Assess the contribution of information systems to the operation of the organisation

  5. Explain the range of activities involved in information systems management

COURSE CONTENT

DEFINING INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Elements of data and information;

Defining Systems;

Defining Information Systems;

Types of business information systems

Types of business functions;

Information required by business functions;

HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE

Categories of Computer Systems

Components of Computer

Categories and Purpose of Software Applications

Advantages and Disadvantages of Applications Software

Applications Software and Business Activities

QUALITY OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS

The need for quality systems and decision making;

The effects of poor quality data and information;

Managing and improving quality systems; presentation of information;

Production of quality information;

Use of appropriate software to build a quality information system.

ACQUIRING INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Technology acquisition;

Bespoke Development;

Off-the-shelf-Software;

End-User-Developed software;

Factors affecting software acquisition;

INFORMATION SYSTEMS STARTEGY

Defining Strategy;

Integrating IS Strategy with Business Strategy;

The competitive environment and strategic advantage;

Strategic development of information systems;

MANAGEMENT OF BIS

Operational management of information systems;

Information Systems Spending and Business Benefits;

Location Alternatives of IS function in organisation

MANAGING IS SECURITY

Potential Threats and risks to Computer-based Info Systems

Overall Strategy for ensuring Computer Security

Technique for Protecting against Damage and Access

END USER COMPUTING

Defining End-user computing;

Distinguish End User Computing and End User Development

Services to support end users effectively

Risks of End User Computing and IS Strategy

Managing End User Computing

BIS PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Elements of Project Management

Project Management and Creation of BIS

Tasks of Project Manager

Techniques for Project Management

ETHICAL LEGAL AND MORAL ISSUES

Defining Ethical, Legal, Moral and Professional Issues

Dealing with conflicting Ethical, Legal, Moral and Professional Issues

Decision making based on Ethical, Legal, Moral and Professional Issues

Appropriate legal action based on professional conduct

Legislation in respect of Ethical, Legal, Moral and Professional Issues

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 
   

Two Assignments of equal weight

20%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

Bocij P., Greasley A., Hickie S, (2008), Business Information Systems, FT Prentice Hall, ISBN 9780273716624.

RECOMMENDED READING

Turban Efrahim, Aronson Jay, (2010), Decision Support Systems and Business Intelligence Systems, Pearson, ISBN 0132453233, Lots of theory and case studies

Chaffey and Wood, (2005), Business Information Management, FT Prentice Hall, ISBN 0273686550 : Useful chapters on data and information quality

Gray, Paul, (2006),Manager’s Guide to Making Decisions about Information Systems, Wiley ISBN 0471263591

Flower & Fawcett,Management of Information Technology – Bankers Workbook (CIB/Bankers Books)

BBC 231: Financial Accounting

Pre-requisite: None

AIM

To develop knowledge and understanding of the underlying principles and concepts relating to financial accounting and technical proficiency in the use of double-entry accounting techniques including the preparation and interpretation of basic financial statements for sole traders, partnerships and companies.

RATIONALE

Accounting is the life line of any business. A business without proper accounting will suffer loses over and over again until it collapses. Accounting makes it possible for a business to know its financial standing and whether or not to invest in growth. Accounting makes it possible for a business to measure its heartbeat during the trading period and particularly so at the end of the accounting period, thus ensuring relevant taxes are appropriately paid. This course is meant to convert a novice into an articulate person with regard to accounting.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain context and purpose of the accounting framework of business entities.

  2. Record transactions and events

  3. Demonstrate the use of the double-entry system of accounting and prepare a trial balance including identifying and correcting errors

  4. Account for assets and liabilities

  5. Prepare basic financial statements for incorporated and unincorporated entities.

  6. Evaluate financial performance of an organization through calculation and analysis of basic ratios

  7. Describe the features of public sector accounting

COURSE CONTENTS

1.0 GENERAL ACCOUNTING FRAMEWORK FOR BUSINESS ENTITIES

  1. Types of business entities

  2. Need for Accounting Information

  3. Users of financial statements and their interests

  4. Accounting Concepts and conventions – Fair presentation, Going concern, Accruals, Consistency, Materiality, Relevance, Reliability, Faithful representation, Substance over form, Neutrality, Prudence, Completeness, Comparability, Understandability, Business entity concept

  5. Roles and Functions of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the International Financial Reporting Interpretation Committee (IFRIC). Zambia Accounting Standards Committee, Zambia Institute of Chartered Accountants (ZICA)

  6. The IASB’s Framework for Financial Reporting.

2.0 RECORDING TRANSACTIONS AND EVENTS

      1. Business transactions and documentation

      2. Books of Prime Entry and the Journal

      3. Classification of Accounting Transactions.

3.0 DOUBLE ENTRY BOOKKEEPING AND ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS

      1. Form and content of accounting records

      2. The Cash Book

      3. Analytical Petty Cash Book

      4. Accounts Receivable and Accounts Payable Ledgers, Bad debts and Discounts

      5. General Ledger

      6. Trial Balance

      7. Control Accounts

      8. Bank Reconciliations

      9. Correction of Errors

      10. Accounting for Value Added Tax

4.0 ACCOUNTING FOR ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

      1. Distinction between capital and revenue expenditure

      2. Accounting for acquisition, disposal, depreciation and revaluation of non-current assets, tangible and intangible.

      3. Accounting for current assets including inventory, trade receivables, prepayments and cash

      4. Accounting for current and non-current liabilities including trade payables, accrued expenses and loans

      5. Accounting for owners’ equity

5.0 PREPARATION OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Financial Statements for Sole Traders

  1. Preparation from Trial Balance with adjustments

  2. Preparation from Incomplete Records

Financial Statements for Non-profit making organizations

  1. Receipts and Payment account

  2. Income and Expenditure account

  3. Balance Sheet (Statement of financial position)

  4. Accumulated Fund Statement

Financial Statements for Partnerships,

  1. Income Statement (Statement of profit or loss)

  2. Current Accounts

  3. Capital Accounts

  4. Balance Sheet (Statement of financial position)

Financial Statements for Limited Companies

  1. Income Statement(Statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income)

  2. Balance Sheet (Statement of financial position)

  3. Statement of Changes in Equity

  4. Statement of cash flows

  5. Treatment of Events after the reporting period and Contingent assets and liabilities

Financial Statements for manufacturing organizations

  1. Manufacturing account

  2. Income Statement (statement of profit or loss)

  3. Balance Sheet (statement of financial position)

6.0 INTERPRETATION OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

  1. Liquidity Ratios

  2. Profitability Ratios

  3. Efficiency Ratios

  4. Gearing Ratios

  5. Investment Ratios

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

2 hours/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 
   

Two Assignments of equal weight

20%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. BPP (2011) Paper T1 Financial Accounting, 1st Edition. London: BPP Learning Media.

  2. BPP (2013) FIA FFA Financial Accounting, 2nd Edition. London: BPP Learning Media.

  3. Wood, F. and Sangster, A. (2011) Business Accounting 1, 11th Edition. London: Pearson

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Millichamp, A. H. (1997) Foundation Accounting. DP Publications

  2. Clark, P. J. (1990) Financial Accounting. Gill & Macmillian

BBC 241: DATABASES AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

PRE-REQUISITES:

AIM:

To introduce the student to the fundamental concepts necessary for designing, using and implementing database systems. This includes the creation and analysis of data models, the implementation and manipulation of these models using database systems themselves.

RATIONALE:

Database systems play a vital role in most businesses and organisations by maintaining information and making it rapidly available on demand. This course provides students with a good understanding of the motivation for and principles underlying database systems. Particular emphasis is placed on the relational model (now widely adopted by industry). Other topics include query language design and basic storage structures.

OBJECTIVES

On completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Design and implement a database using the different modelling methods

  2. Apply the basic tools and techniques, which are used to design, to implement and to maintain large information systems in organizations.

  3. An in-depth understanding of a number of important developments in the database field (such as object-oriented databases) and

  4. An awareness of future trends, especially for distributed databases and Internet access.

COURSE CONTENTS:

The entity-attribute-relationship approach to data analysis

  1. Entity-Relationship modelling

  1. Normalization of data

First, second, third, fourth and fifth normal forms, effects of normalization on updating and retrieving data.

  1. Description of files, records and fields

Analysis of hardware and its effect on file structures, Tape, Disc file organization and processing, Serial, Sequential, indexed sequential and random, factors affecting file design.

  1. Database Management Systems

  1. Overview of Database Management

Operational data, Advantages and features of database approach, Logical and physical data independence

  1. Data Models

The network model-DBTG proposals, the hierarchical model and IMS, The relational model, Relational algebra and calculus, SQL Data Modelling, E-R diagrams and Bachman diagram, Functional dependencies, Normalization Good and bad decompositions

  1. DBMS implementation

Physical organization, Concurrency control, Recovery, Integrity, Security

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

     
   

Laboratory / Practical Work

20%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

Elmasri Ramez, Navathe S.B (2010): Fundamentals of Database Systems (6th Edition), Addison Wesley; ISBN-13: 978-0-136-08620-8; New York.

Date C.J. (2003): An Introduction to Database Systems (8th edition), Addison Wesley; ISBN-10: 0321197844

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Cannolly T, Begg C. (2009) Database Systems (5th edition), Addison Wesley. ISBN-13: 978-0-321-52306-8

  2. Date C.J., Darwen Hugh (1998): Foundation for Object/Relational Databases; The third Manifesto, Addison-Wesley; ; ISBN-13: 978-0-321-52306-8.

  3. M. Tamer Ozsu and Patrick Valduriez(2011): Principles of Distributed Database Systems, Springer (3rd Edition). ISBN-10: 1441988335.

BBC 212: HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION

PRE-REQUISITES: None

AIM:

This course presents a comprehensive introduction to the principles and techniques of human computer interaction

RATIONALE:

HCI is concerned with the joint performance of tasks by humans and machines. It stresses the importance of good interfaces and the relationship of interface design to effective human interaction with computers. Specifically, we concentrate on interactive systems. This course uses an integrative and cross-disciplinary approach to bring together a broad variety of topics together in relation to the problem of developing quality user interaction designs to provide an introduction to the field of HCI. This course focuses on application of user-centered design principles, guidelines, and evaluation. This course provides the concepts of HCI and user interfaces, focusing on user interface design, evaluation, and technologies.

OBJECTIVES:

On completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Propose design approaches that are suitable to different classes of user and application

  2. Identify appropriate techniques for analysis and critique of user interfaces

  3. Be able to design and undertake quantitative and qualitative studies in order to improve the design of interactive systems

  4. Understand the history and purpose of the features of contemporary user interfaces

COURSE CONTENTS:

  1. Foundations of Human computer interaction

Contexts of HCI, processes for user-centered development, Different measures for evaluation, physical capabilities that inform interaction design, cognitive models that inform interaction design, Principles of good design and good designers

  1. Human-centered software evaluation

Setting goals for evaluation, evaluation without users, evaluation with users

  1. Human-centered software development

Approaches, characteristics, and overview of process, functionality and usability, specifying interaction and presentation, prototyping techniques and tools

  1. Graphical user-interface design

Choosing interaction styles and interaction techniques, HCI aspects of common widgets,

HCI aspects of screen design, handling human failure, beyond simple screen design,

Multi-modal interaction, 3D interaction and virtual reality

  1. Graphical user-interface programming

Dialogue independence and levels of analysis, Widget classes, Event management and user interaction, Geometry management, GUI builders and UI programming environments, Cross-platform design

  1. HCI aspects of multimedia systems

Categorization and architectures of information, Information retrieval and human performance , HCI design of multimedia information systems , Speech recognition and natural language processing , Information appliances and mobile computing

  1. Psychological user models

Black box models of human performance, including perception, motor control, memory and problem-solving.

  1. Quantitative analysis of performance

The Model Human Processor, Keystroke Level Model, GOMS descriptions of user performance.

  1. Modelling of system understanding

Mental models and metaphor, Use of design prototypes, Controlled experiments.

  1. Cognitive walkthrough

Evaluation from the perspective of a novice learning to use the system.

  1. Task analysis and design

Contextual and qualitative studies, use-case driven design

  1. Research techniques

Cognitive dimensions of notations, CSCW, ubiquitous computing, new interaction techniques, programmability.

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 
   

Two Assignments of equal weight

10%

 
   

Laboratory / Practical Work

10%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED BOOKS:

  1. Sharp, H., Rogers, Y. & Preece, J. (2007). Interaction design: beyond human-computer interaction. Wiley (2nd ed.). ISBN: 978-0-470-01866-8

RECOMMENDED BOOKS:

  1. Carroll, J.M. (ed.) (2003). HCI models, theories and frameworks: toward a multi-disciplinary science. Morgan Kaufmann. ISBN :978-1558608085

BBC 222: COMPUTER NETWORKS AND DATA COMMUNICATIONS

Pre-requisites:

None

AIM:

The course aims to give an understanding of the principles of communication across networks.

RATIONALE:

Computer networks have become an essential tool enabling users to communicate with other systems and to co-operate on applications. The course will cover the design and operation of both local and wide area networks, illustrated with typical practical examples in widespread use.

OBJECTIVES

On completion of this course, the student should:

  1. Appreciate the need for network protocols and standards;

  2. Understand and describe the principles of operation of local and wide area networks

  3. Be familiar with the practical operation of typical networks;

  4. Acquire a working knowledge of the internet protocol suite

COURSE CONTENTS:

  1. Introduction

Uses of Computer Networks, network Hardware, network Software, reference Models,

example Networks, network Standardization, Metric Units

  1. The physical layer

The Theoretical Basis for Data Communication, Guided Transmission Media,

Wireless Transmission, Communication Satellites, Digital Modulation and Multiplexing,

The Public Switched Telephone Network, the Mobile Telephone System, cable television

  1. The data link layer

Data Link Layer Design Issues,Error Detection And Correction, Elementary Data Link Protocols,Sliding Window Protocols, Example Data Link Protocols

  1. The medium access control sublayer

The Channel Allocation Problem, multiple Access protocols, Ethernet, wireless LANS,

Broadband Wireless, Bluetooth, RFID, Data Link Layer Switching.

  1. The network layer

Network Layer Design Issues, Routing Algorithms, Congestion Control Algorithms,

Quality of Service, Internetworking, the Network Layer in the Internet.

  1. The transport layer

The Transport Service, Elements of Transport Protocols

Congestion Control Algorithms, the Internet Transport Protocols: UDP

The Internet Transport Protocols: TCP, Performance Issues, Delay Tolerant Networks.

  1. The application layer

DNS – The Domain Name System, Electronic Mail, the World Wide Web,

Real-time Audio and Video, Content Delivery and Peer-To-Peer.

  1. Network security

Cryptography, Symmetric-Key Algorithms, Public-Key Algorithms, Digital Signatures, Management of Public Keys, Communication Security, Authentication Protocols,

Email Security, Web Security, Social Issues.

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

Two Assignments of equal weight

20%

 
   

Laboratory / Practical Work

   
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED TEXTBOOKS:

  1. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, David J. Wetherall, Computer Networks, 5th Edition), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, 5th edition (2010), ISBN-10: 0132126958, ISBN-13: 978-0132126953

  2. Larry L. Peterson, Bruce S. Davie, Computer Networks, Fifth Edition: A Systems Approach, Morgan Kaufmann; Burlington, Massachusetts, 5th edition (2011), ISBN-10: 0123850592, ISBN-13: 978-0123850591

  3. Troy McMillan, Cisco Networking Essentials, Sybex, Hoboken – New Jersey, 1st edition, (2011), ISBN-10: 1118097599, ISBN-13: 978-1118097595

RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS:

  1. James F. Kurose, Keith W. Ross, Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach, Pearson, London, 6th edition, (2012), ISBN-10: 0132856204, ISBN-13: 978-0132856201

  2. Barrie Sosinsky, Networking Bible, Wiley, Boston, 1st edition, (2009), ISBN-10: 0470431318, ISBN-13: 978-0470431313

BBC 232: Introduction to Financial Management

Pre-requisites:

None

AIM

The aim of the course is to provide students with a rigorous understanding of the principles of financial management, and enhance understanding of how businesses operate and how finance functions support businesses in achieving their goals.

RATIONALE

While Financial Accounting teaches the ropes of figures, Financial Management is a strategic function that enables business manages to grapple with management issues. This course, read together with Financial accounting makes a business person a better manager of the organisation’s finances. It makes the one to appreciate the company from an overview perspective and trains the mind to to appreciate the wider environment in which the business operates.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the role and purpose of financial management and the impact of the economic environment on financial management

  2. Discuss and apply working capital management techniques

  3. Explain and calculate the cost of capital and factors which affect it and carry out effective investment appraisal

  4. Discuss and apply principles of business and asset valuation and identify, evaluate alternative sources of business finance

  5. Explain and apply risk management techniques in business.

COURSE CONTENT

PART A

  1. Financial Management function

  1. The nature and purpose of financial management

  2. Financial objectives and relationship with corporate strategy

  3. Stakeholders and impact on corporate objectives

  4. Financial and other objectives in not for profit organisations

  1. Financial Management Environment

  1. The economic environment for business

  2. The nature and role of financial markets and institutions

  3. The treasury function

  1. Working capital management

  1. The nature, elements and importance of working capital

  2. Management of inventories, accounts receivable, accounts payable and cash

  3. Determining working capital needs and funding strategies

  1. Cost of Capital

  1. Risk, return and cost of capital

  2. Estimating the cost of equity, cost of debt and other capital instruments

  3. Estimating the overall cost of capital and impact of cost of capital on investments

  4. Capital structure theories and practical considerations.

PART B

  1. Investment Appraisal

  1. Investment appraisal techniques

  2. Allowing for inflation and taxation in investment appraisal

  3. Adjusting for risk and uncertainty in investment appraisal

  4. Specific investment decisions (lease or buy, asset replacement, capital rationing)

  1. Business Finance

  1. Sources of and raising short term finance

  2. Sources of and raising long term finance

  3. Internal sources of finance and dividend policy

  4. Gearing and capital structure considerations

  5. Finance for Small and Medium size entities

  1. Business Valuations

  1. Nature and purpose of the valuation of business and financial assets

  2. Models for the valuation of shares

  3. The valuation of debt and other financial assets

  4. The efficient market hypothesis (EMH) and practical considerations in the valuation of

Shares

  1. Risk Management

  1. The nature and types of risk and approaches to risk management

  2. Causes of exchange rate differentials and interest rate fluctuations

  3. Hedging techniques for foreign currency risk

  4. Hedging techniques for interest rate risk

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 
   

Two Assignments of equal weight

20%

 
   

Laboratory / Practical Work

   
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Arnold, G. (2008) Corporate Financial Management, 4th Edition. London: FT Prentice Hall.

  2. Atrill, P. (2008) Financial Management for decision Makers, 5th edition. London: FT Prentice Hall.

  3. Eugene, F. B. Michael, C. E. (2005) Financial Management – theory and practice, 2nd edition. London: Thompson.

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. BPP (2012) Paper F9 Financial Management Study Manual. London: BPP Learning Media.

  2. Brealey, R. A., Meyers, S. C. and Marcus, A. J. (2008) Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 6th edition. New York: McGraw Hill.

  3. Knot, G. (2004) Financial Management, 4th Edition. London: Palgrave.

  4. McLaney, E. J. (2009) Business Finance Theory and Practice, 8th edition. London: FT Prentice Hall.

  5. Watson, D. and Head, A. (2009) Corporate Finance: Principles and Practice, 5th edition. London: FT Prentice Hall.

BBC 242: Project Management

Pre-requisites:

None

AIM

Project management has become critical to the operations of businesses or organizations. Therefore this module deals with general principles of project management that are applicable to a wide range of institutions undertaking projects to meet organizational goals.

RATIONALE:

Businesses deal with lot of projects during their lifetime. It is thus necessary for business persons to appreciate the role of project management in the management of the project that they undertake. The course introduces the student to the concepts of project management, thus making it possible for the student to articulate both the concepts of project management and the critical role project management plays in organizations.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain foundational knowledge of project management

  2. Propose, develop and execute project planning activities suitable for a project

  3. Analyse and evaluate work estimates and resources

  4. Describe aspects of controlling projects

  5. Explain the formulate of risk management processes or plans

  6. Describe project termination procedures

COURSE CONTENTS

  1. Projects and the Changing World

  2. Project Organization and Environment

  3. Selecting Projects

  4. Project Stakeholders and Team Building

  5. Project Planning

  6. Project Scheduling

  7. Resource Management, Estimation and Allocating

  8. Controlling Projects, Tools and Techniques

  9. Project Communication and Reporting

  10. Quality and Managing Risks

  11. Project Evaluation

  12. Project Closeout

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

50%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

Two Assignments of equal weight

20%

 
   

Laboratory / Practical Work

10%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

50%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

Schwalbe Kathy,(2010), Managing Information Technology Projects, 6th Edition, Course Technology – Cengage Learning, USA. ISBN-13:978-0-324-78855-6

Pinto.,J.K. (2013) Project Management – Achieving Competitive Advantage, 3rd Edition, PEARSON.

RECOMMENDED READING 

Portny., S.E., Mantel., S.J., Meredith., J.R., Shafer., S.M. and Sutton., M.M. (2007) Project Management – Planning, Scheduling and Controlling Projects, WILEY.

BBC 311: E-Commerce

Pre-requisites:

AIM

This course is aimed at introducing students to the concepts and procedures associated with doing business on the Internet.

RATIONALE

Developments in computing technology and communication systems, most notably the internet, have created many new business opportunities for electronic commerce. New mechanisms for making money have developed. This course focus on the E-Commrce Business Models, features of E-Commrce websites and the tools used to build E-Commerce websites, marketing issues, payment options, security issues, and customer service.

OBJECTIVES

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. outline a basic model of the Internet technology infrastructure

  2. assess E-Commerce strategies and applications, including online marketing, E-government, E-Learning and global E-Commerce

  3. identify and explain fundamental web site tools including design tools, programming tools, and data processing tools.

  4. identify the major electronic payment issues and options.

  5. discuss security issues and explain procedures used to protect against security threats.

  6. identify and discuss management issues underlying e-Commerce issues including organizational structure, strategic planning, goal setting, and corporate social responsibility, international arena, changing market intermediaries, resource allocation and customer service.

  7. discuss common legal, ethical and tax issues in E-Commerce

COURSE CONTENTS

  1. Introduction to E-commerce

The difference between e-commerce and e-business; Types of e-commerce; Origins and Growth of E-commerce; Impact of E-commerce on Consumer, Organization and Society; Benefits and Limitations of E-commerce to Consumer, Organization and Society; Barriers to E-commerce

  1. E-commerce business models and concepts

Business-to-consumer (B2C); Business-to-business (B2B); Business-to-Government (B2G) business models; Business models in other emerging e-commerce areas; How the Internet and Web change business, strategy, structure, and process

  1. Building an E-commerce website

Planning; Systems analysis and design; Building the system: In-house vs. outsourcing; Website hosting: In-house vs. outsourcing; System Testing; Implementation and maintenance; Website optimization factors; Choosing web server software; Overview of E-commerce website development tools

  1. Security and Encryption

The E-commerce security environment; Types of threats; Technology solutions: Protecting Internet communications, Encryption, Securing channels of communication, Secure socket layers (SSL), Protecting networks – Firewalls, Protecting servers and clients – OS controls/Anti-virus software, Cryptography and Public key infrastructure (PKI), Certification Authorities and Digital Certificates, Digital signatures Technology

  1. Web Payment Solutions

Payment systems; Merchant Accounts, Payment Gateways, Credit Cards Processing & Third Party Payment Processors; E-commerce digital payment in the B2C arena; Electronic Check, E-Cash, SET based payment systems

  1. E-marketing Concepts

The Internet audience; Internet traffic patterns; Use of Social media; What consumers shop for and buy online; Basic marketing concepts; On-site Marketing Techniques – customer feedback, links, banner ads, affiliate programs, newsletters, emails

  1. Social, Legal, and Ethical Issues of e-Commerce

Impact of e-commerce on society; Legal/policy issues in e-commerce; Zambia ICT policies.

  1. Auctions, Portals, and Communities

Benefits of auctions; Risks and costs of auctions; The growth and evolution of portals; Types of portals; Online communities/social networks

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

Course Project

10%

 
   

Assignment

5%

 
   

Laboratory / Practical Work

5%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Laudon, K. C., & Traver, C. G. (2012). E-Commerce: Business, technology, society (8th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall. ISBN: 1256691860 or 9781269194914

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Turban, E., et al. (2012). Electronic Commerce: A Managerial and Social Networks Perspective. Pearson/Prentice Hall, ISBN: 978-0-13-214538-1

BBC 321: Principles of Management

Pre-requisites:

None

AIM

This course aims at providing the students with an understanding of organisational settings, concepts of managing organisations and their contribution to organisational efficiency and effectiveness.

RATIONALE

Organisational management is a cornerstone organisational success factor which anyone involved with management needs to be aware. How one handles fellow workers in an organisation can make or break an organisation. Theories of management go back a long way and they have evolved over time to be in line with the current environment. In a digital age such as that applying at the moment, organisational management has seen the increased use of digital technology but by and large certain management theories remain intact. Taking a course in management makes a student a better person in dealing with organizational issues which involve not only people but other resources as well.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss the approaches to organisation and management

  2. Identify and explain the nature and context of organisations

  3. Explain how organisations can be designed and structured for success

  4. Discuss the human resource function in managing organisations

  5. Examine and explain processes of organisational change and organisational development

COURSE CONTENTS

  1. Approaches to Organisation and Management

  1. Theory of management:- Developments in management

  2. Classical approach,

  3. Human relations approach,

  4. Contingency approach

  1. The nature and context of organisations

  1. Different types of organisations and their characteristics

  2. Benefits and limitations of different types of organisations

  3. Different types of stakeholders

  4. Small and medium sized enterprises

  1. Design and structure of organisations

  1. Role and purpose of core functions

  2. Different structures of organisations

  3. Organisation of internal relationships

  4. Design of structure, processes and relationships

  5. Culture and behaviour

  1. Management Functions and processes

  1. Main functions and processes of management

  2. Discuss literature relating to each of the functions and the processes in (a)

  3. Role of the manager and principles of management

  4. Management skills

  1. The Nature of leadership

  1. Difference between management and leadership

  2. Theories of leadership

  3. Leadership in modern organisations

  4. Nature and uses of different styles of leadership

  5. Uses, benefits and possible obstacles to delegation

  1. Human Resources management

  1. Role of human resources management

  2. Human resources management functions-recruitment, development, performance management and managing relations

  3. Theories of motivation

  1. The impact of the environment on the organisation

  1. Layers of the environment

  2. Impact of external environment on the organisation

  3. Analysis of the internal environment

  4. Summary of the analysis (SWOT)

  1. The concepts of organisational goals and strategy

  1. Define and discuss organisational goals

  2. Define and discuss organisational strategy

  3. Distinguish between organisational goals

  4. Discuss the concept of pluralism in an organisational context

  1. Change Management

  1. Different types of change

  2. Impact of change to organisation

  3. Techniques for managing change

  4. Styles of managing change

  5. Resistance to change and how to manage resistance

  6. Role of leadership in managing change

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

50%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Tests

40%

 
   

Assignments

10%

 
   

Final (Theory)

 

50%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Mullins, L. J. (2010) Management and Organisational Behaviour, 9th Edition. London: Pearson.

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Bratton, J. and Gold, J. (2007) Human Resource Management: Theory and Practice, 4th Ed. Palgrave: Macmillan.

  2. Handy, C. B. (2005) Understanding Organisations. Penguin Business Library.

  3. Johnson, G., Whittington, R. and Scholes, K. (2011) Exploring Corporate Strategy, 9th Ed. London: Pearson

BBC 331: WIRELESS AND MOBILE NETWORKS

Pre-Requisites:

AIM

The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to major global wireless standards and compares the different wireless technologies and their applications. The performance and capacity of each system in practice is analysed and explained, accompanied with practical tips on how to discover the functionality of different networks.

RATIONALE

Wireless systems such as GSM, UMTS, LTE, WiMAX, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth offer possibilities to keep people connected while on the move. This course contains not only a technical description of the different wireless systems available today, but also explains the rationale behind the different mechanisms and implementations; not only the ‘how’ but also the ‘why’ is focused on. Thus the advantages and also limitations of each technology become apparent.

OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course students will be able to

  1. identify and describe wireless communication networks and their evolution
  2. illustrate basic principles of wireless and mobile networks with focus on computer and data networks, Knowledge of basic protocols and interfaces.
  3. acquire a good knowledge about the role of mobile networks in the internet-centric future telecommunication networks.
  4. analyse and propose broad solutions for a range of mobile scenarios.
  5. offer a solid introduction to major global wireless standards and comparisons of the different wireless technologies and their applications.

COURSE CONTENTS

      1. Wireless network technology overview

Wireless communications primer; channel characteristics; capacity laws, networking paradigms: infrastructure based (cellular networks, wireless LANs), networking paradigms: distributed networks (ad hoc, sensor and mesh networks, DTN

      1. Physical layer

WiFi (802.11) PHY layer, ZigBee (802.15.4) PHY layer, LTE PHY layer

      1. MAC layer

WiFi MAC, MAC layer: reverse and forward engineering, MAC layer: energy efficiency.

      1. MAC/PHY cross-layer design

Collision resolution, Full-duplex networking, MAC layer overhead reduction, MIMO and multi-user MIMO networks

      1. Routing layer

Routing in ad-hoc, sensor and mesh networks, Network coding

      1. Transport layer

TCP for wireless

      1. Wireless and mobile applications

Application performance, Mobile sensing, Localization

      1. Emerging wireless technologies and challenges

Whitespace networking, Energy efficiency of wireless network infrastructure, Coexistence of heterogeneous wireless networks.

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Tests

20%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

Course Project

10%

 
   

Assignments

5%

 
   

Labs

5%

 
   

Final (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Sauter M (2011), From GSM to LTE: An Introduction to Mobile Networks and Mobile Broadband,(1st Edition) Wiley, West Sussex,ISBN-10: 0470667117 ,ISBN-13: 978-0470667118

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Lin Y, Chlamtac(2008), wireless and mobile network architectures, Wiley India Pvt ISBN: 8126515600, 9788126515608

BBC 341: Object-Oriented Analysis and Design

AIMS:

The Course aim is to provide the students about the importance of systems analysis and design in solving complex problems Construct various UML models (including use case diagrams, class diagrams, interaction diagrams, state chart diagrams, activity diagrams, and implementation diagrams) using the appropriate notation.

RATIONALE

Within the discipline of software engineering, the object-oriented paradigm has evolved as one of the most promising. It is now widely used, not only during the software implementation phase but also in the analysis and design phases of a software development project. This course will address these issues.

OBJECTIVES

On completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. be able to design and analyse programs using design patterns and UML

  2. effectively use Java libraries.

  3. pointing out the importance and function of each UML model throughout the process

  4. of object-oriented analysis and design and explaining the notation of various elements in these models.

  5. providing students with the necessary knowledge and skills in using object-oriented

  6. CASE tools

CONTENTS:

Introduction

Object-Oriented Programming Languages and the object-oriented model

Complex problems and complex systems, Basic features and elements of the object-oriented approach Object-oriented analysis, design, and implementation

Objects and Classes Messages and Interfaces Inheritance and Polymorphism,

Advantages, Limitations and Applications of the object-oriented approach

, Models and modelling languages A Unified methodology Types of models

UML views and basic features, Object-oriented design methodologies, the rational unified process, Object-oriented CASE tools: Introducing Rational Rose.

Object Oriented Analysis

Object Orientation, OO Methods, OOA approaches, Analysis in OMT, Identify objects and classes ,Identify associations and aggregations, Identify attributes, Simplify object classes using inheritance, Verify access paths for likely queries, Iterate and refine model, Group classes into modules, analysis in Use Cases

Object Oriented concepts and examples

OOD To OOP, abstraction and ADT, class Hierarchies, Modularity, Inheritance, ,Encapsulation and Information hiding, Interfaces, Polymorphism, Overloading and overriding, Early and Late binding, Boxing and Unboxing, Abstract and sealed classes, Design Issues for OOP Languages, The Exclusivity of Objects Subclasses as Types, Type Checking and Polymorphism, Single and Multiple Inheritance, Object Allocation and De-Allocation, Dynamic and Static Binding, Nested Classes

Classes and Class Models in UML

Attributes and operations, Association and whole-part relationships

Aggregation and composition, Roles, navigability, and constraints,· Generalization and inheritance relationships, Dependency, More on classes: Qualified and derived associations, Association classes, Properties, tagged values, and Stereotypes, Abstract classes and Parameterized classes.

Use Case Models in UML (as a gap between OOA and OOD)

Actors and services, System boundary, Use-case relationships and Use-case generalization, Actors and classes, using use-cases in software development

OO Modeling, Design methodologies, Interaction diagrams

Design approaches, methods to get design entities from requirements,

Domain modeling and class diagrams, Class associations, whole part relationships,

Generalization and Inheritance

Interaction diagrams

Interaction and collaboration,· Collaboration diagrams,· Sequence diagrams, Message passing and timing, Conditional behavior and iteration,· Concurrency

State and Activity Diagrams in UML

Activity diagrams,· State diagrams

Packages and subsystems

Packages, Subsystems, Models

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

Grade Distribution

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Tests

20%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

Quizzes

10%

 
   

Assignments

5%

 
   

Labs

5%

 
   

Final (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Booch G, Maksimchuk R. A, Engle M.W, Young B.J, Conallen J & Houston K.A (2007). Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with Applications, 3/E, Addison-Wesley Professional, ISBN-10: 020189551X • ISBN-13: 9780201895513

  1. Craig L (2005) Applying UML and Patterns: An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development, 3/e , Prentice Hall, ISBN-10: 0131489062 | ISBN-13: 9780131489066

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Brett McLaughlin, Gary Pollice, David West (2006). Head First: Object-Oriented Analysis and Design, O’Reilly Media , ISBN-13 : 978-0-596-00867-3

  1. Jia X (2003) Object Oriented Software Development Using Java, 2/E, Addison-Wesley, ISBN-10: 0201737337, ISBN-13: 9780201737332

BBC 312: Business Systems Analysis

Pre-requisites:

AIM

The aim of the course is to equip students with leadership, problem solving and decision making skills that are in great need in the modern competitive business environment.

RATIONALE

Problems solving is integral part of business management. This course is intended to get the student to appreciate issues with identifying, defining and solving business problems in an organization. It explains the role of a business analyst, one of the well paid person in the ICT industry. Various tools of decision making are considered in order to make the student ready for the real world.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

1. Define and explain the underpinning concepts of problems identification, problem solving and

decision making in the business area.

1. Define and manage change both in the private and public sectors.

2. Apply the appropriate tools and techniques to problems solving;

3. Formulate problems into mathematical terms;

4. Apply appropriate techniques of solution.

CONTENT

INTRODUCTION

. Defining Business Systems Analysis.

The Role of the Business Analyst.

Business Systems

REQUIREMENTS CAPTURE

Requirements Elicitation

Requirements Analysis.

TOOLS FOR ANALYSIS

Analysis Tools for Problem Identification.

Analysis Tools for Identifying Improvement Priorities.

Analysis Tools for Decision Making.

Analysis Tools for Identifying Processes.

Analysis Tools for Planning Resources.

Analysis Tools for Process Improvement.

CONTROLLING PROCESSES

Controlling and Improving Processes.

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

50%

Tutorials

2 hours/week

Two Tests of equal weight

40%

 
   

One Seminar Presentation

10%

 
   

Final (Theory)

 

50%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

O’Loughlin Eugene, (2009), An Introduction to Business Systems Analysis, Problem Solving Techniques and Strategies, Dublin, Athenaeum Press. ISBN: 978-1-905785-61-2

Bocij P, Greasley A, and Hickie S. (2008), Business Information Systems: Technology, Development and Management of the E-Business, 4th Edition, Financial Times, Prentice Hall.

RECOMMENDED READING

International Institute of Business Analysis,(2009) A Guide to the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge (BABOK Guide), Version 2.0, IIBA.

Project Management Institute, (2008), A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge, 4th Edition. PMI.

Slack N, Chambers S, and Johnston R. (2008), Operations Management, 5th Edition,Financial Times / Prentice Hall.

Laudon J. and Laudon K. (2008), Essentials of Management Information Systems, 8th Edition, Pearson Education.

Higgins J.M. (2005), 1010 Creative Problem Solving Techniques: The Handbook of New Ideas for Business, The New Management Publishing Company.

BBC 322: Ethics in Business Practice

Pre-requisites:

None

AIM

The aim of the course is to introduce students to elementary concepts and frameworks regarding ethical issues that generally affect professionals in organizations and the society.

RATIONALE

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

1. explain the challenges and predicaments that individuals or professionals may encounter in the

course of discharging their professional duties.

2. demonstrate familiarity of the particulars of some well-known ethical cases that lead both

management and professional staff to disrepute.

3. appraise the choices or decisions affecting the relationships and arguments that emerge

concerning employees, managers and the various legal, social aspects of the real world.

COURSE CONTENTS

1. Introduction to Ethics

2. The Role of Ethics

3. Ethics and Organizations

4. Ethical and Moral Theories

5. Professional and Corporate Ethics

6. Social and Environmental Issues

7. Work Ethic in Crisis

8. Teaching Work Values

9. Work in the Organization

10. The Organization in Society

11. Ethics and Organizational Effectiveness

12. Ethics and the Future

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

50%

Tutorials/ Case Study

1 hour/week

Two Assignments of equal weight

20%

 
   

One Group Presentation

30%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

50%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

Hoffman W.M and Frederick R.E – Business Ethics: Readings and Cases in Corporate Morality

Beder, S. – Selling the Work Ethic

RECOMMEDED READING

KAPLAN Publishing – Understanding Professional Ethics

Crane, A. & Matten, D. (2003). Business ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

BBC 332: Corporate Governance and Risk Management

Pre-requisite: None

AIM

The aim of this course is to equip students with the knowledge and skills required to manage strategic risks faced by organisations.

RATIONALE

Many organisations fail to sustain themselves due to succumbing to risks that they are faced with and constantly battle. Risk management is an intricate part of management roles that is performed at the strategic level. Managers who are unable to manage risks and have poor governance skills always end up leading their organisations to doom. Corporate Governance and Risk Management arms the student with the skills to be an effective risk manager.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. define governance and explain its function in the effective management and control of organisations and of the resources for which they are accountable.

2. evaluate the business professional’s role in internal control, review and compliance.

3. explain the business professional’s role in identifying and assessing risk.

4. explain the role of business professional in controlling and mitigating risk.

5. demonstrate the application of professional values and judgement through an ethical

framework that is in the best interests of society and the profession, in compliance with

relevant professional codes, laws and regulations.

COURSE CONTENTS

PART A Governance and responsibility

  1. The scope of governance

  2. Agency relationships and theories

  3. The board of directors

  4. Board committees

  5. Directors’ remuneration

  6. Different approaches to corporate governance

  7. Corporate governance and corporate social responsibility

  8. Corporate failure

PART B Identifying and assessing risk

1. Risk and the risk management process

2. Categories of risk

3. Identification, assessment and measurement of risk

PART C Controlling risk

1. Targeting and monitoring risk

2. Methods of controlling and reducing risk

3. Risk avoidance, retention and modelling

4. Risk policy

PART D Professional values and business ethics

  1. Ethical theories

  2. Different approaches to ethics and social responsibility

  3. Professions and the public interest

  4. Professional practice and codes of ethics

  5. Conflicts of interest and the consequences of unethical behaviour

  6. Ethical characteristics of professionalism

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

50%

Tutorials Case Study

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

30%

 
   

Two Assignments of equal weight

20%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

50%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Kaplan Publishing (2009) Understanding Professional Ethics. Berkshire: Kaplan Publishing.

  2. BPP Learning Media (2012) P1 Governance, Risk and Ethics Study Text. London: BPP Learning Media.

  3. BPP Learning Media (2011) Paper L8 Risk Management and Control Systems, 1st Edition. London: BPP Learning Media.

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Crane, A. & Matten, D. (2003). Business ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  2. Gray, R., Owen, D. and Adams C. (1995) Accounting and Accountability: changes and challenges in corporate social and environmental reporting. London: Prentice Hall.

  3. Monks, A. G. and Minow, N. (2004). Corporate governance, 3rd edition. Malden MA: Blackwell.

  4. Solomon, J. (2006). Corporate governance and accountability, 2nd edition. West Sussex: Wiley and Sons.

BBC 342: MULTIMEDIA

Pre-requisites:

None

AIM

This course presents a comprehensive introduction to the principles and techniques of human computer interaction and also introduces the fundamental aspects of multimedia

RATIONALE

The interactive presentation of text, data, images, movies and sound, especially via the world-wide internet has become the most widespread and pervasive application of computer systems in the world. Our students should understand the basic principles underlying this means of communication and be able to effectively use the available tools. This course uses an integrative and cross-disciplinary approach to bring together a broad variety of topics together

OBJECTIVES

On completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the principles and characteristics of the current formats used for storing and transmitting audio and video information

  2. Use the current mark-up languages and authoring tools for multimedia web pages.

  3. Explain the operation and use of search engines on the world-wide web.

  4. Set up and maintain a state-of-the-art web site, including (distributed) database access and secure forms handling.

  5. Propose design approaches that are suitable to different classes of user and application

  6. Identify appropriate techniques for analysis and critique of user interfaces

  7. Be able to design and undertake quantitative and qualitative studies in order to improve the design of interactive systems

  8. Understand the history and purpose of the features of contemporary user interfaces

COURSE CONTENTS:

  1. Introduction to Multimedia

Definitions, studying the growth of multimedia,

Exploring multimedia on the Web Education, Entertainment and Business Applications,

Multimedia and computer playback systems, multimedia and computer development systems

  1. Multimedia Elements – Text and Graphics

Using Text and Graphics in Multimedia and the Web, files sizes and formats of text and graphics, software for working with graphics and text, sources of graphic images.

  1. Multimedia elements – Sound, Animation and Video

Understanding Sound, Animation and Video (Virtual reality), 2D and 3D animation,

usage of sound, Animation and video on the web, video compression and editing

  1. Multimedia compression basics

Lossless Compression, variable length coding, dictionary based coding,

basics for lossy Compression, fourier Transform, discrete Cosine Transform,

Application to image compression (JPEG compression).

  1. Video Processing

Fundamental concepts of video, image and video compression, MPEG video coding,

MPEG4, 7, and beyond.

  1. Audio Processing

Basics of digital audio, Quantization and transmission of Audio, Audio compression,

Audio MPEG.

  1. Multimedia authoring tools

Multimedia authoring programs, Multimedia programs – Slide show, Card and Book Metaphor, icon based and time based program, programming and Scripting languages,

Web-based multimedia development programs.

  1. Multimedia applications

Content-based retrieval in digital libraries, case studies.

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials/ Case Study

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

20%

 

Laboratory

3 hours/week

Project Work

20%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Ranjan Parekh, Ranjan, ( ), Principles of Multimedia. Mcgraw Hill Higher Education, India. ISBN-10: 0070588333, ISBN-13: 978-0070588332.

  2. W. Burger & M. Burge.( ), Digital Image Processing: An algorithmic introduction using Java”, Springer 978-1-84628-379-6

  3. P. Havaldar and G. Medioni. ( ), Multimedia Systems – Algorithms, Standards and Industry Practices”, Cengage Learning – 978-1-4188-3594-1

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Gibbs S., Tsichritzis D. (1995): Multimedia programming: Objects, Environments, and Framework, Addison-Wesley.

BBC 411 ADVANCED DATABASES

PRE-REQUISITES: BBC 241

AIM:

This course intended to introduce students to advanced concepts in database management including data warehouses, On-line Analytical Processing (OLAP), use of XML as a data exchange language and web computing.

RATIONALE:

Database systems are a very important part of modern information systems. A second course on topic is therefore necessary; it should include topic such as object-orientation, distributed databases and security/reliability issues, data warehousing, data mining and cloud computing.

OBJECTIVES

On completion of this course, the successful student is expected to be:

  1. Familiar with advanced databases technology such as OLAP, OLTP
  2. Understand recent trends in database development
  3. Understand the concept of distributed databases and able to design a distributed database.
  4. Familiar with database administration
  5. Familiar with Cloud computing concepts

COIURSE CONTENTS

  1. Transaction processing

Transactions; Failure and recovery, Concurrency control, database backup and recovery, database security.

  1. Object-Oriented Databases

Standards and systems, Semantic and object-oriented data models, Object-relational databases systems, Querying in object-oriented databases.

  1. Distributed databases

Functions and architecture of distributed databases, Types (Homogeneous, heterogeneous, federated), Data allocation; data fragmentation, Replication and transparencies, Client-server systems, Distributed query processing, Distributed transaction model.

  1. Web technology and database application

Scripting,

Database connectivity (ODBC, JDBC, XML),

Semi structure data and XML,XML query languages,Building web applications,Web servers.

  1. Multimedia databases and mobile databases

Data warehousing concept, OLTP, Data warehousing architecture, Data warehouse data flow, Data warehousing tools and technologies, Data marts, Digital libraries

  1. Data mining techniques and tools

OLAP, predictive modelling, database segmentation, database administration of distributed and enterprise databases

  1. Cloud Computing

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation: MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures: Three hours per week Continuous assessment (C.A.) 40% Tutorials: One hour per week C.A. Breakdown Practical work 20%

Lab: Three hours per week Tests 20%

Final (Theory) Examinations 60%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Connolly Thomas M. and Begg Carolyn E. (2009) Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation and Management, 5th Edition, Addison Wesley (ISBN-10: 0321523067 | ISBN-13: 978-0321523068)

  2. Elmasri R. and Navathe S. (2010) Fundamentals of Database Systems, 6th edition, Pearson Education (ISBN-10: 0136086209 | ISBN-13: 978-0136086208)

  3. Harris A. B. (2008), PHP 6/MySQL Programming for the Absolute Beginner, 1st edition, Cengage Learning PTR (ISBN-10: 1598637983 | ISBN-13: 978-1598637984)

  4. John R. (2010) Cloud Computing Explained: Implementation Handbook for Enterprises, Recursive Press (ISBN: 0956355609)

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. IBM Redbooks (1998). Mastering Data Warehousing Functions. (IBM Redbook DB2/400) Chapters 1 & 2 only, IBM (ISBN-10: 0738400696 | ISBN-13: 978-0738400693)

  2. George R. (2009) Cloud Application Architectures, 1st edition, O’Reilly Media (ISBN: 0596156367)

BBC 421– INFORMATION AND NETWORK SECURITY

Pre-requisites:

AIM

The aim of this course is to provide students with a thorough understanding of the issues associated with the design, provision and management of security services for modern computer communication and information systems.

RATIONALE

Information is an important strategic and operational corporate asset. Today, computers and computer networks are increasingly being used for storing and retrieving information. Most of this information is of a sensitive nature and hence the need to have adequate security measures that can safeguard sensitive information. This course introduces the principles of computer security beginning by investigating some of the security measures that can be employed to safeguard information. The rest of the course looks at into the theory that goes into designing these measures rather than studying security tools and techniques. This is because there are too many of those tools out there and they are changing frequently. The course examines how system designs, network protocols, and software engineering practices can result in vulnerabilities. The course explores how to better design and implement future systems in order to mitigate vulnerabilities. In addition, the course explores how to detect and mitigate vulnerabilities in existing systems.

OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course students will be able to

  1. Describe the fundamental concepts of information system security.

  2. Understand the following terms: security policy, host based security, firewall, packet filtering and intrusion detection.

  3. Use various software tools to analyze network and host vulnerabilities.

  4. Design Systems that comply with commonly accepted security standards.

  5. Differentiate threats to information systems from attacks against information systems

  6. Differentiate between laws and ethics

COURSE CONTENTS

  1. Introduction to Security

Meaning of Security, Attacks, Computer Crime, Methods of Defense, Encryption

  1. Cryptography

Introduction Cryptography, Substitution Ciphers, Transpositions, Encryption Algorithmes; Symmetric Encryption, Data Encryption Standards(DES), Advanced Encryption Standards(AES); Public Key Encryption, Hash Functions, Key exchange, Digital Signatures

  1. Viruses and Malicious Code

Program security, Control Against Program Threats

  1. Operating Systems Security

Access Control, File Protection, User Authentication, Security Policies, Models of Security

  1. Database Security

Security requirements, Reliability and Integrity, Protecting sensitive data, Multilevel security

  1. Security in Networks

Threats, Attacks, Protocol Flaws, Impersonation, Spoofing, Denial of Service, Networks security control; Firewalls, Intrusion Detection, Secure e-mail

  1. Risk Analysis and Security Planning

Security Policies; Physical Security

  1. Legal and Ethical Issues

Protection of data and Information Laws, Employees rights, Software failure, Computer Crime, Privacy, Ethics

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

Grade Distribution

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Tests

20%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

Course Project

10%

 
   

Assignment

5%

 
   

Labs

5%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Pfleeger P. C., and Pfleeger L. S., (2011), Analyzing Computer Security: A Threat / Vulnerability / Countermeasure Approach, Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, ISBN-10: 0132789469, ISBN-13: 978-0132789462

  2. Stallings W.,, (2010), Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Practice (5th Edition), Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, ISBN-10: 0136097049, ISBN-13: 978-0136097044

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Bishop M., (2004), Computer Security: Art and Science, Addison-Wesley: Boston MA, ISBN-10: 0321247442,ISBN-13: 978-0321247445

  2. Stinson R. D., (2005), Cryptography: Theory and Practice, Third Edition (Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications) third edition; Chapman and Hall/CRC: Boca Raton, Florida, ISBN-10: 1584885084, ISBN-13: 978-1584885085

BBC 431: Web Engineering

Pre-requisites:

None

AIM

The aim of this course is to enable students to build rich web applications that interoperate with web based services and to develop new web based platforms to support business processes.

RATIONALE

The business of modern times has its roots in digital technology. Being able to build one’s own websites saves an organization a lot of money. It also makes it possible for an organization to decide on the extent of visibility it will have on the internet. The course will equip the student with knowledge and skills of building such web sites.

OBJECTIVES

On completing this course successfully you will be able to:

  1. Analyze and design comprehensive systems for the creation, dissemination, storage, retrieval, and use of electronic records and documents.

  2. Use some of the client-side and server-side languages used to manipulate information on the World Wide Web – i.e. PHP, and Javascript.

  3. Discuss the techniques and evaluation metrics for ensuring the proper operability, maintenance and security of a web application.

COURSE CONTENTS

      1. Introduction to Web Engineering and its requirements,

      2. Client-Side Technologies,

      3. Web Application Architectures,

      4. The Web Application Development Process,

      5. Server-Side Technologies,

      6. Introduction to AJAX,

      7. Responsive Web Design & Testing,

      8. Security for Web Applications,

      9. Operation & Maintenance of Web Applications,

      10. Web Project Management,

      11. Emerging Web Technologies and Platforms.

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

10%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

Two Assignments of equal weight

10%

 
   

Laboratory / Practical Work

20%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

Laboratory or Practical work will involve the development of a database application and supporting documentation.

« Fewer matches

PRESCRIBED READING

Bates, C., (2006), Web Programming: Building Internet Applications, John Wiley & Sons Inc (3rd Ed), ISBN: 0470017759

Garfinkel, S., Spafford, G.,(2003), Web Security, Privacy & Commerce, O’Reilly UK (2nd Ed), ISBN: 0596000456

RECOMMENDED READING

Ullman, L.,(2004), PHP for the World Wide Web: Visual QuickStart Guide, (2nd Ed), ISBN: 0321245652

Schneier, B., Applied Cryptography ( ) Protocols, Algorithms and Source Code in C, John Wiley & Sons Inc, ISBN: 0471117099

Schneier, B., ( ), Secrets and Lies: Digital Security in a Networked World, John Wiley & Sons Inc, ISBN: 0471253111

BBC 441: Consultancy Skills

Pre-requisites:

None

AIM

The overall aim of this course is to equip the student with general management consulting techniques and practises that are being applied in the modern world and to help them understand what it takes to succeed in the consultancy profession by developing their critical & analytical thinking, oral and written communication, ethics and sustainability as well as analytical decision-making skills.

RATIONALE

OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. explain the consulting function and the different aspects of the consulting task,

  2. effectively negotiate and contract various consulting arrangements,

  3. explain client resistance and effectively deal with it,

  4. prepare and present effective business presentations,

  5. prepare winning consulting proposals.

COURSE CONTENT

  1. Introduction to the Consulting Industry

  2. Consultants – Types, Skills, Values, and Consulting as a Profession

  3. Marketing and Selling of Consulting Services

  4. Identifying, Framing and Analysing Problems

  5. Discussion of Data Gathering Methods

Formation of Groups and allocation of assignments

  1. Entry, Contracting and Proposal Writing

  2. Managing Engagements

  3. Intervention and Change

  4. Consulting to CEOs and Boards

  5. Consulting in the Public and Not-for-profit Sector

  6. Consulting to Global Clients

  7. Merger and Acquisition Integration

  8. Managing Consulting Firms – Performance, Growth & Knowledge Sharing Problems

  9. The Future of Consulting

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

50%

Tutorials Case Study

1 hour/week

Group Assignment

30%

 
   

Presentation Skills

20%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

50%

   

Total

 

100%

Presentation Skills includes individual presentations by the students on a selected business issue

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Peter Block, 2011. Flawless Consulting: A guide to Getting your Expertise Used. Third Edition, Pfeiffer.

  2. Greiner, Larry E. and Poulfelt, Flemming. The Contemporary Consultant – Insights from Experts. Thomson South-Western Publishing. 2004.

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Barcus, Sam W., & Wilkinson, Joseph W. (Editors). Handbook of Management Consulting Services. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1995.

  2. Greenbaum, Thomas L. The Consultant’s Manual. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1990.

  3. Holtz, Herman. How to Succeed as an Independent Consultant. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1993.

  4. Bell, Chip R. and Leonard Nadler. Clients and Consultants: Meeting and Exceeding Expectations. 2nd Edition. Gulf Publishing Company, Book Division, Houston.

BBC 412: SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

PREREQUISITE: BBC 132

AIMS:

  • To provide a basic understanding of the software life cycle and the methods and techniques used in the disciplined development of software.

  • To develop an understanding of the important features of good software design.

  • To discuss use of formal mathematical approaches to creating reliable software.

  • To introduce the students to the concepts of and motivations for object-oriented analysis and design of software systems

  • To train the students to effectively use these notations, concepts and patterns when designing software systems and make efficient use of program-support tools

RATIONALE:

Managing a large software project is challenging and difficult task: it usually involves a large number of people with different interests and backgrounds (clients, future users, system engineers, telecommunications experts, network experts, system analysts, programmers etc.). Once the system is put into actual use, it has to be maintained and adapted to changing environments and new requirements. It is important for a computer scientist to understand the different tools and techniques that have been proposed to carry out this task.

OBJECTIVES:

On completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Design medium sized programs using formal methods

  2. Document software requirements using formal and informal specification methods

  3. Use a range of notational techniques to express different aspects of a design.

  4. Be able to design and analyze programs using design patterns and UML

  5. Effectively use Java libraries.

  6. Plan and develop a large programming project using software engineering tools.

COURSE CONTENTS:

  1. Overview of Software Engineering:

Software engineering, Key challenges in software engineering, CASE, professional and ethical responsibility

  1. Software Process Models

Waterfall Model, Evolutionary Development, Computer Based Software engineering (CBSE), Process iteration

  1. Agile software development:

Agile methods, plan-driven and agile development, extreme programming,

agile project management.

  1. Requirements engineering:

Functional and non-functional requirements, software requirements document,

Requirements specification, engineering processes, elicitation and analysis,

validation and requirements management

  1. System modeling:

Context models, interaction models, structural models, behavioural models and Model-driven engineering.

  1. Architectural Design:

Architectural design decisions, architectural views, architectural patterns,

Application architectures.

  1. Object-oriented design using the UML:

What is object-orientation, modelling concepts, requirements capture, requirements analysis ,object interaction ,specifying operations, specifying control, system architecture,

System design.

  1. Software testing:

Test planning, test analysis and design, test execution, test reporting,

acceptance testing.

  1. Quality and Risk management:

Quality concepts and control techniques, software standards, reviews and inspections,

quality assurance, risk management.

  1. Software process improvement and change management:

Process measurement, analysis and change, the CMMI process improvement framework,

ISO and IEEE Software Engineering standard, version management, system building,

Release management

  1. Metrics and reliability assessment:

Software metrics, software complexity measures, measures of software coupling and cohesion, models and associated measures of software quality.

  1. Software maintenance and evolution:

Impact Analysis, versioning, refactoring, reverse and Re-engineering of software,

Lehman’s Laws of Software Evolution

  1. Distributed software engineering:

Distributed systems issues, client–server computing, architectural patterns for distributed systems, cloud computing (Software as a Service, platform as Service, Infrastructure as a Service and Implications to Software Engineering)

  1. Mobile software engineering:

Principles of software engineering for mobile devices and best practices, including code reviews, source control, and unit tests.

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

40%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Tests

20%

 

Labs

3 hours/week

Assignments

20%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

60%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Ian Sommerville(2010), Software Engineering,9th Edition, Addison Wesley, ISBN: 978-0137035151

  2. Simon Bennett, Steve Mc Robb and Ray Farmer(2010) , Object-Oriented System Analysis and Design using UML, 4th Edition, Mc Graw Hill, 2010, ISBN: 978-0077125363

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Roger S. Pressman(2009), Software Engineering: a practitioner’s approach, 7th edition. McGraw-Hill, ISBN : 978-0071267823

  2. Stevens Perdita, Pooley Rob (2000). Using UML: Software Engineering with Objects and Components, Addison-Wesley.

BBC 422: Business Strategy

Pre-requisites:

Introduction to Management

AIM:

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the cognitive processes and develop core analytical tools which underpin the management of strategy in organisations.

RATIONALE

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. apply analytical tools needed for the evaluation and comprehension of the extent to which firms achieve strategic success in comparison with their strategic objectives;

  2. analyse, apply and evaluate the concepts and models of strategy appraisal and selection of strategic directions;

  3. argue cogently about strategy implementation;

  4. put strategy into perspective relative to other areas of organisational activity and demonstrate their interconnectedness within the whole;

  5. critique strategy theories and frameworks with a view to developing deep understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of strategic management; and

  6. develop and apply an understanding of strategic management and its contribution to the firm’s performance and competitive advantage.

COURSE CONTENTS

PART A Introduction

  1. Alternative definitions of strategy

  2. The strategy lenses

  3. The different levels of strategy

  4. The main elements of strategy

PART B Purpose, Expectations and Ethics

  1. Definitions of Corporate Purpose

  2. Methods of Communicating Corporate Purpose

  3. Corporate Governance and Business Ethics

PART C The General Environment

  1. Why organisations need to scan and monitor their environment.

  2. The key layers of the environment.

  3. PESTEL Analysis

  4. National Competitive advantage

  5. SWOT Analysis

PART D The Competitive Environment

  1. The Methodology of an Industry Analysis

  2. Groups and Market Segments

  3. The Industry Life Cycle and Hyper competition

PART E Internal Analysis

  1. Resources and Competences

  2. The Value Chain and Value network

  3. The VRIO/ VRIN framework

  4. Benchmarking

  5. Innovation and learning

PART F Strategic Choices and Evaluation

  1. Business level Strategies: Generic Strategies

  2. Strategies at corporate level

  3. Methods and Direction of Growth

  4. International strategies

  5. Strategy evaluation

PART G Integrating operational strategies into corporate strategy

  1. Information Systems and Strategy

  2. Marketing and strategy

  3. Processes and Strategy

  4. Human resources management and strategy

PART H Strategy implementation and performance management

  1. Structure and Culture

  2. Managing Strategic Change

  3. Performance management and control

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

50%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

30%

 
   

Two Assignments of equal weight

20%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

50%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Johnson, G., Whittington, R. and Scholes, K. (2012) Exploring Corporate Strategy, 11th Edition. London: Pearson.

  2. Campbell, D., Stonehouse, G. and Houston, B. (2002) Business Strategy: An Introduction. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann.

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Thompson, A. A., Peteraf, M. A., Gamble, J. E. and Strickland 111, A. J. (2009) Crafting and Executing Strategy. Boston: McGraw-Hill Irwin.

  2. Wheelen, T. C., Hunger, D. J., Hoffman, N. and Bamford, C.E. (2014) Strategic Management and Business Policy, 14th Ed. London: Pearson.

BBC 432: Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship

Pre-requisites:

None

AIM

The course aims to present fundamental principles of entrepreneurship by introducing students to the study of entrepreneurship in order to enable them to understand the different types of entrepreneurs and various forms of entrepreneurial organisations.

RATIONALE

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. explain why entrepreneurship is an important endeavour and identify the main themes in studying entrepreneurship;

  2. discuss diverse economic and social contributions made by entrepreneurs, new firms and growing firms;

  3. discuss the views of different scholars on entrepreneurship;

  4. explain the different types of entrepreneurs and how each type impacts on the performance of the enterprise;

  5. evaluate the various forms of entrepreneurial organisations;

  6. evaluate the extent to which external environmental conditions can shape the pursuit of entrepreneurship; and

  7. discuss the sources of finance and the challenges faced by entrepreneurs in obtaining finance.

  8. Discuss the growth strategies and challenges of entrepreneurial firms.

COURSE CONTENT

PART A Introduction: Context and issues

Defining Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship as a field of study;

Growth in entrepreneurship education

PART B Contributions of entrepreneurial firms

The positive contributions of entrepreneurial firms; Challenges of entrepreneurial firms; Policy to support enterprise

PART C Theoretical approaches to the study of entrepreneurship

Economic approaches; Sociological and Psychological approaches; A taxonomy of entrepreneurial theory

PART D Types of entrepreneurs

The nature, characteristics and behaviour of the entrepreneur; Habitual entrepreneurs; High technology and academic entrepreneurs

PART E Types of organisations: alternative routes to entrepreneurship

Family firms; Corporate entrepreneurship; Management buyouts; Social entrepreneurship

PART F External environmental context

Drivers ; Barriers

PART G Entrepreneurial finance

Business plans; Sources of finance; Venture Capital; Government assistance

PART H Growth of Entrepreneurial Firms

Need for growth; Growth strategies; Growth challenges; Marketing the firm

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

3 hours/week

Continuous Assessment

 

50%

Tutorials

1 hour/week

Two Tests of equal weight

30%

 
   

Enterprise Business Plan

20%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

50%

   

Total

 

100%

PRESCRIBED READING

  1. Westhead, P., Wright, M. and McElwee, G. (2011) Entrepreneurship: Perspectives and cases. London: Pearson Education Limited.

  2. Kirby, D. A. (2009) Entrepreneurship. Berkshire: McGraw Hill Education.

RECOMMENDED READING

  1. Barringer, B. R. and Ireland, R. D. (2010) Entrepreneurship: successfully launching new ventures. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

  2. Scarborough, N. M. D., Wilson, D. L. and Zimmerer, T. W. (2009) Effective Small Business Development: An Entrepreneurial Approach. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

  3. Stokes, D. and Wilson, N. (2010) Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship, 6th edition. United Kingdom: Cengage Learning EMEA.

BBC 442: Business Computing Project

Pre-requisites: All Other Business Computing Courses

AIM

To develop a student’s ability to plan and tackle in depth and largely working alone, a selected business problem, drawing on and extending ideas encountered during the program of study.

To develop the student’s ability to critically evaluate the work of others, relate it to the student’s own work and to summarise their findings in an appropriate report or dissertation.

RATIONALE

Prospective employers often require that the student is able to tackle a non-standard problem, organise their work and present their conclusions both orally and in a written report. Similarly admissions tutors for Postgraduate courses and Research awards need to be reasonably certain that an applicant will be able to research a topic and write a corresponding thesis. This course will provide the student with the opportunity to develop their ability to plan, organise and work independently on, a selected business problem, drawing on and extending ideas encountered during the programme of study. The student is expected to critically evaluate the work of others and relate it to their own work where appropriate.

This course will guide students through the stages of an individual substantive project through personal supervision and tutorials. During these tutorials and personal supervisions, students will be directed to undertake a student led project, which originates from within the School, from a sponsor, or from their own interests. Acceptable projects will lead to the design and implementation of a software product and a written report of the project and the development process.

Projects must involve the design and implementation of a business software product and a written report (dissertation) of the project and the development process. The project is expected to prepare the student for real life projects in the work place.

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course the student will have:

1. Assessed the scope and feasibility of a business project requiring between 150 and 200 hours

of individual effort.

2. Used project management techniques to plan, organise, schedule and control their business

project.

3. Produced a formal Business Project Proposal that includes justification for the project and an

appropriate set of objectives for the project.

4. Undertaken an appropriate literature study, using a variety of sources and methods for

collecting reference material.

5. Identified business problems to be resolved during the project life cycle, and determined

possible solutions to these problems.

6. Demonstrated analytical thinking and critical evaluation.

7. Carried the project through to a logical conclusion.

8. Written up the work carried out in a substantial report.

COURSE CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

Definition of a project

Types of Projects

Role of Student in Projects

Role of Supervisor in Project

PROJECT PROPOSAL

Format

Title

Overview

Objectives

Initial References

Project Plan and Use Case

PROJECT REPORT CONTENTS

Project Preamble

Beginning of Project

Middle of Project

End of Project

References and Bibliography

Appendices

DETAILED REPORT CONTENTS

A. Abstract /Preface

Acknowledgements

Plagiarism Statement

Table of Contents

List of Figures

List of Tables

B. Literature Review

Objectives, Activities and Methods

Similar Systems

C. Requirements Capture and Analysis Models

Design Specification and Design Models

Implementation and Implementation Models

Testing and Test Logs

Critical Evaluation

Conclusion

Screen shorts

MODE OF DELIVERY

Time Allocation

MARK DISTRIBUTION

Lectures

2 hours/week

Coursework Assessment

 

100%

Supervisory Meeting

1 /week

Development

30%

 

Oral Presentation

1 half way in Semester

Product

30%

 
   

Report

40%

 
   

Final Examination (Theory)

 

0%

   

Total

 

100%

The work will be assessed both by the supervisor and the report second marked by another member of the academic staff. The two major assessment components are Development and the Final Product.

Students would normally undertake one particular type of project, the constructive / development project. A constructive / development project is a design and build project which leads to an end product together with a project report of 12,000 words +/- 10%.

PRESCRIBED READING

Dawson, C.W. (2005)

Projects on Computing and Information Systems: A Student’s Guide

Prentice Hall 

2005 

0-321-263553 

 

Weaver Philip, (2004), Success In Your Project – A Guide to Student System Development Projects, FT Prentice Hall, Hallow England.

RECOMMEDED READING

Dawson, C. W., (2000) “The Essence of Computing Projects: A Student’s Guide”, Prentice-Hall

ISBN 0-13-021972-X

Booth, W.C., Colomb, G.G., & Williams, J.M., (1995) “The Craft of Research”, The University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-06584-7 paper / 0-226-06583-9 cloth

Cornford,T. and Smithson, S., (1996) “Project Research in Information Systems: A Student’s Guide”, Macmillan. ISBN 0-333-64421-2

Robson, C., (1995), “Real World Research: A Resource for Social Scientists and Practitioner-

Researchers”, Blackwell ISBN 0-631-17688-8

Sharp, J.A. and Howard K., (1996) “The Management of a Student Research Project” (Second

Edition), Gower. SBN 0-566-07706-X

John M. Swales, Christine A. Beer Feak

Academic Wirting for Graduate Students

University of Michigan Press 

2004 

0-4720-88564 

 

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